She lived a life both blind and deaf until a neighbor told her about a surgery she needed.
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TOMS One for One

When people used to see a woman named Tikka on the streets of Nepal, her head was often faced down toward the ground.

She wasn't trying to be anti-social...


...she just couldn't see or hear anything.

I don't blame her. It was hard to interact!

Tikka was blind and deaf and wasn't able to take care of herself or contribute to her community like she wanted. Luckily, her hero daughter never left her side, making sure Tikka had what she needed every day. And as any caretaker knows, that's an exhausting life.

But Tikka didn't have to be blind. She just didn't know it.

After all, it's hard to know about your options when you don't have any around you. In fact, 80% of all blindness in the world is either preventable or curable — but what happens when the cure isn't available?

In comes Seva.

Down the road in a nearby village, a Seva Eye Camp had set up shop. A neighbor told Tikka's family that there was a mobile surgical center for people who needed access to eye care and to sight-restoring surgeries but lacked the typical resources in the areas they lived in. Areas like remote villages in Nepal.

Tikka and her daughter caught word of the eye camp and walked the distance to check it out. Their world was about to get a whole lot bigger and brighter. She was able to get the 15-minute cataract surgery she didn't know she needed.

In just the last 25 years, the Seva Foundation has provided surgery to restore the eyesight of 3.5 MILLION people around the world.

That's a lot — and Tikka was one of them. I love it!

Her smile is the best... and you can see more of it in the video below.

The coolest part? You too can help people like Tikka see again through a TOMS-supported cataract surgery from their Sight Giving Partner, Seva. Your purchase of TOMS eyewear helps restore sight to an individual through sight-saving surgery, prescription glasses or medical treatment.

If you don't need another pair of sunglasses, it's all good. You can also support the Seva Foundation by directly donating to the organization here.

The gift of sight can open up a whole new world and help us all work toward a more equal, productive, and happy time while we're here on this planet ... together.

Tikka knows the power of sight. Her story is quite a special one. Check out her story here:

Every murder of an innocent person is tragic, but the cold-blooded killing of a child is too heinous to even think about. So when a man walks up to a 5-year-old riding his bike in broad daylight and shoots him in the head in front of his young sisters, it's completely reasonable that people would be horrified. It's an unthinkable and unforgivable act.

Cannon Hinnant didn't deserve to die like that. His parents didn't deserve to lose him like that. His sisters didn't deserve to be scarred for life like that. We can all agree that a horrible tragedy in every way.

His murderer—Hinnant's dad's next door neighbor, Darius Sessoms—deserved to be rounded up, arrested, and charged for the killing. And he was, within hours. He deserves to be punished to the full extent of the law, and history indicates that he assuredly will be. The system is working exactly as it's supposed to in this case. Nothing can be done to bring Cannon back, but justice is being served.

So why is #SayHisName trending with this story, when that hashtag has long been used in the movement for Black Lives? And why is #JusticeForCannon being shared when justice is already happening in this case? Why is #ChildrensLivesMatter a thing, when there's never been any question that that's the case?

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When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

When online advertising seems to know us this well, it begs the question: are our phones listening to us?

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I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

Melanie Cholish/Facebook

While this poster is great to bring attention to the issue of child trafficking, it is a "shocking" picture of a young girl tied up. It has that dark gritty feeling. I picture her in a basement tied to a dripping pipe.

While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

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