Sharon Stone was asked about sexual harassment. She went into a fit of laughter.

On January 14, actress Sharon Stone sat down with the anchors of "CBS Sunday Morning" to chat about the next phase of her career.

After decades as a Hollywood A-lister, Stone dropped out of the limelight when she suffered serious brain hemorrhaging after a stroke in 2001. "There was about a 5% chance of me living," she explained to CBS correspondent Lee Cowan. Now healthy and ready to turn a new leaf, the single mom of three is ready for her next act.


Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images.

The conversation soon veered toward what's become the elephant in the room in nearly every conversation about Hollywood these days: The film industry's sexual harassment problem. After four decades as a public figure, Stone didn't shy away from the fact that she has more than a few stories to tell.

When asked by Cowan if she'd ever been sexually assaulted or harassed, Stone immediately broke into a laughing fit for a full 10 seconds.

Yep, we counted. GIF via CBS Sunday Morning.

"I've been in this business for 40 years, Lee," she explained with a knowing look on her face.

"Can you imagine the business I stepped into 40 years ago — looking like I look, from nowhere, Pennsylvania? I didn't come here with any protection."

As a fresh-faced young woman new to the scene, you can bet Stone was targeted by men all too willing to cross the line, as she suggested in the clip below shared by journalist Yashar Ali:

Obviously, Stone has seen and experienced a lot. And by now, it's clear she isn't in the minority, either.

Hollywood has a serious sexual harassment problem to fix.

The October 2017 bombshell report exposing Harvey Weinstein as a serial sexual predator set off a domino effect of survivors coming forward, toppling heavyweights like Louis C.K., Kevin Spacey, and Matt Lauer.

Disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein. Photo by Yann Coatsaliou/AFP/Getty Images.

The #MeToo movement — a term originally coined by activist Tarana Burke but recently popularized by actor Alyssa Milano — burst into headlines, as millions of women joined the conversation surrounding sexual abuse.

Though #MeToo is publicly linked to the film industry, the movement stretches far beyond the glitz and glamour of Hollywood.

In the months since the Weinstein bombshell, dozens of powerful men in industries stretching from news media and filmmaking to politics and music have been accused of sexual misconduct. The moment has also given a voice to millions of women who'd previously had no public platforms to speak out — and finally be believed.

Survivors have been attacked and their stories have been questioned, to be sure. Backlash to the movement has been swift (and expected). Yet we've still taken meaningful steps toward a culture that empowers women to speak their truths.

"It's not just a story affecting the entertainment industry; it's one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace," Oprah Winfrey said during her recent widely-praised Golden Globes speech. "They're the women whose names we'll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and they're in academia, engineering, medicine, and science."

Far too many women share Stone's sentiment when it comes to sexual harassment: "I've seen it all," she concluded to Cowan on "Sunday Morning."

Hopefully, future generations won't be able to say the same.

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June 26, 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the signing of the United Nations Charter. Think of the Charter as the U.N.'s wedding vows, in which the institution solemnly promises to love and protect not one person, but the world. It's a union most of us can get behind, especially in light of recent history. We're less than seven months into 2020, and already it's established itself as a year of reckoning. The events of this year—ecological disaster, economic collapse, political division, racial injustice, and a pandemic—the complex ways those events feed into and amplify each other—have distressed and disoriented most of us, altering our very experience of time. Every passing month creaks under the weight of a decade's worth of history. Every quarantined day seems to bleed into the next.

But the U.N. was founded on the principles of peace, dignity, and equality (the exact opposite of the chaos, degradation, and inequality that seem to have become this year's ringing theme). Perhaps that's why, in its 75th year, the institution feels all the more precious and indispensable. When the U.N. proposed a "global conversation" in January 2020 (feels like thousands of years ago), many leapt to participate—200,000 within three months. The responses to surveys and polls, in addition to research mapping and media analysis, helped the U.N. pierce through the clamor—the roar of bushfire, the thunder of armed conflict, the ceaseless babble of talking heads—to actually hear what matters: our collective human voice.

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The lengths people will go to discredit a political figure—especially a Black female politician—is pretty astounding. Since Kamala Harris was announced as Joe Biden's running mate, we've seen "birther" claims that she wasn't really born in the U.S. (she was), alternating claims that she's too moderate or too radical (which can't both be true), and a claim apparently designed to be a "gotcha"—that her ancestor in Jamaica was a slave owner.

According to Politifact, the claim that Harris descends from a slave owners is likely true. In their rather lengthy fact check on her lineage, which has not revealed any definitive answers, they conclude, "It seems possible that Kamala Harris is as likely a descendant of a slave-owner as she is an enslaved person." But that doesn't mean what the folks who are using that potential descencency as a weapon seem to think it means.

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When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

When online advertising seems to know us this well, it begs the question: are our phones listening to us?

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UPDATE/EDITOR'S NOTE: This article was successfully removed from Facebook thanks in part to this article from Annie Reneau and also thanks to readers like you who took action and demanded accountability from Facebook. We're sharing it again as an example of how we can all be part of positive and constructive change on social media. Don't let the trolls win!

Original story begins below:

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As we say in the viral stories world, there's viral and then there's viral. A post with 100K shares in a month would be considered super viral. A post with a millions shares—even over a long period of time—is nearly unheard of.

So the fact that a post about Irish slaves has been shared nearly a million times in just nine days is incredibly disheartening. Why? Because it's fake, fake, fake. And not in an "I don't like what this says so I'm going to call it fake" kind of way, but in a non-factual, already-debunked-by-real-historians kind of way.

As someone with a crapton of Irish ancestry, I find the perpetuation of the Irish slaves myth utterly embarrassing—especially since it's most often shared in an attempt to downplay the history of Black slavery in the U.S. If it were true, that kind of deflection would still be annoying. But pushing false history narratives to deny the reality of the impact of institutionalized, race-based chattel slavery is just gross.

And to be sure, this is false history. To begin with, the photo isn't even of Irish people at all. It's a photo of Belgian miners crammed into a mining elevator around the year 1900.

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Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Sometimes a boycott succeeds when it fails.

Although the general aim of a boycott is to hurt profits, there are times when the symbolism of a boycott gives birth to a constant, overt and irreversible new optic for a company to nurse.

When the boycott of Facebook began in June and reached its peak in July, it gathered thousands of brands who vocalized their dissatisfaction with the platform.

The boycott, under the hashtag #StopHateForProfit, was launched by civil rights groups. By July brands were fully behind removing their ad spending - resulting in a small financial dent for the social media juggernaut, but a forceful bludgeoning in the press.


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