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Rescue puppy Pegasus wasn't expected to live long. A time-lapse shows her life 6 months later.

"In the end we try our best and our pets teach us incredible lessons."

Rescue puppy Pegasus wasn't expected to live long. A time-lapse shows her life 6 months later.

When Dave Meinert rescued a puppy named Pegasus, he was told she didn't have much time to live.

Most of her siblings were deformed or had died right after birth, and he was told that if Pegasus was able to survive, she'd most likely be deaf and blind.

Woof.


Awwwww. GIFs via Dave Meinert.

So Dave decided to enjoy the time he had with her by documenting her days.

Here's what the course of six months looked like. I think you're going to like it.

What's the right way to go about rescuing a dog?

The decision is a big one, and there's a lot of information out there on what to do and what not to do.

One piece of advice Meinert gave me: "Decide what kind of dog you want in terms of their nature. You have such control over it based on how you choose to train him/her. If you want a well-mannered, compassionate companion, realize your training needs to mirror this kind of compassion." Makes sense.

The group PAWS also has some helpful tips on choosing a dog:

  1. Be a responsible, informed consumer, and if you do buy from a breeder, go to a reputable one.
  2. Adopt from a shelter or breed-specific rescue group near you. Typically 25% of the dogs in shelters are purebred.
  3. Urge your local pet store to support shelters, and encourage pet stores to promote shelter animals for adoption instead of replenishing their supply through questionable sources.

Rescuing any dog is a challenge, but rescuing a dog with special needs can be particularly difficult.

Pegasus is one lucky and loved pet, but how is she doing today?

Meinert told me she's now based with another Great Dane rescue family because he realized she was too easily stressed by his active lifestyle.

"After the video, I started traveling a lot and it took its toll on her," Meinert said. "Change of any sort stresses her out. In short, the most sensible solution for her was to accept an invitation for her to be based with her best friend, another rescue Great Dane, where she was spending more and more time."

With a combination of vet attention and a stable atmosphere, he says she's doing great and in "incredibly high spirits."

Pegasus' story isn't over, and that's the best news of all.

It's awesome to see the progress a dog (or any pet!) can make with the right amount of love and care. Here's to Pegasus — and the dogs and cats being rescued all over the country — getting a decent shot at life.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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