Please let me love something one day as much as this reggae singer loves cucumbers.

Quick. What makes you more excited than anything else in the world?

A promising Tinder match? A free trip to New Zealand? The New England Patriots losing the Super Bowl?

I'm easy to please. Photo by jeffreyw/Flickr.


Chances are plain vegetables and legumes don't crack your top five.

Mmmm. Nah. Photo by Alexei Hulsov/Pixabay.

Or 50.

Or 5,000.

Unless, of course, you're Macka B, a British reggae artist, who has recently turned his love for cucumbers, herbal tea, pumpkin seeds, and okra into a series of disarmingly earnest and hella catchy a cappella jams.

They're incredibly worthy of a few minutes of your time — not just for the delightful musical pronunciation of "cucumba," but for their boundless, sincere enthusiasm for healthful, nutrient-rich additions to the human diet.

Like many of his reggae brethren, B is a Rastafarian and follows the faith's Ital diet, whose practitioners generally avoid eating meat products, a practice they believe decreases the amount of "livity," or life energy, in themselves and the world. Hence his excitement for raw roughage and hot liquids.

If B's infectious earworms don't convince you to go vegan, that's OK.

Pumpkin seeds! Photo by Daniel Schwen/Wikimedia Commons.

(Though if they do convince you to become one, that's fine too. That shit is super ethical.)

But if you can manage to muster as much excitement for anything as this man can muster for vegan food, you might just unlock the secret of life.

And if it turns out to be pumpkin seeds, honestly, would that really surprise you?

Photo courtesy of Macy's
True

Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

Screenshots via @castrowas95/Twitter

In the Pacific Northwest, orca sightings are a fairly common occurrence. Still, tourists and locals alike marvel when a pod of "sea pandas" swim by, whipping out their phones to capture some of nature's most beautiful and intelligent creatures in their natural habitat.

While orcas aren't a threat to humans, there's a reason they're called "killer whales." To their prey, which includes just about everything that swims except humans, they are terrifying apex predators who hunt in packs and will even coordinate to attack whales several times their own size.

So if you're a human alone on a little platform boat, and a sea lion that a group of orcas was eyeing for lunch jumps onto your boat, you might feel a little wary. Especially when those orcas don't just swim on by, but surround you head-on.

Watch exactly that scenario play out (language warning, if you've got wee ones you don't want f-bombed):

Keep Reading Show less