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People say she's too pretty to be deaf. That's when she hits them with this face.

It's not uncommon for an "innocent" question or comment to end up being unintentionally rude or hurtful. As I like to say, "You don't know what you don't know." In this video, vlogger Rikki Poynter answers some questions you should avoid next time you meet someone who's deaf.

People say she's too pretty to be deaf. That's when she hits them with this face.

This video is full of WTF-worthy comments, but here are a few of my favorites.

"Is deafness contagious?"


"You're too pretty to be deaf!"


"You don't look deaf."

"Can you hear me now?"



All jokes aside, there are millions of deaf and hard-of-hearing people in the United States.

Deaf people are just like everyone else, except they're unable to hear (or have limited hearing). That's it! We have to stop seeing people with disabilities as anything other than people. It's OK to be curious, but it's more important to think before you speak.

Check out the rest of Rikki's advice for "Things You Don't Say to Deaf & Hard of Hearing" people below. And make sure to stick around for 0:59, where she gives one of the best "Oh no she didn't" faces of all time.

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I hope we can all agree that despite the intent, these questions are always a no-go. Give this post a share and spread the word so more people don't make these mistakes!

via schmoyoho / YouTube

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