People are becoming organ donors in droves thanks to this heroic hockey player.

Logan Boulet was one of the Canadian hockey players who passed away after a horrific bus accident.

The Humboldt Broncos' team bus collided with a semi-truck traveling to a play-off game in central Saskatchewan on Friday, April 6. 15 people, including the bus driver, team coach, and several players — were killed.

Just a few weeks ago, on his 21st birthday, Boulet made a heroic decision. He signed up to be an organ donor.


Image via The National/YouTube.

The decision saved lives.

In a heartbreaking but hopeful Facebook post, Boulet's godfather detailed how Boulet's decision made a difference.

"[Boulet] is a great hero and one of the nicest people you would have been lucky enough to meet," Neil Langevin wrote. "Logan had made it known, and very clear to his family, that he had signed his organ donor card when he turned 21 just a few weeks ago."

According to Langevin, six people in need will receive organ transplants from Boulet.

As with many families across the globe our house is devastated with the news about the Humboldt Broncos. Our great...

Posted by Neil Langevin on Saturday, April 7, 2018

Boulet's parents confirmed the positive matches for six of their son's organs to Global News on Saturday. "Even in his eventual passing, he will be a selfless hero," they said in a statement.

A hero whose generosity may save many more lives down the road.

Boulet's selfless act appears to have inspired many to follow his lead, as organ donor sign-ups surged across Canada.

According to a spokesperson for Alberta Health Minister Sarah Hoffman, the province saw a "significant increase" in organ donor registrations over the weekend, the Calgary Herald reported. Nearly 900 people registered between Sunday and Monday — over double the number those days of the week typically see on average. Similar spikes in sign-ups were reported in British Columbia and Ontario, according to CBC News.

Some used social media to express how Boulet inspired them to act. "Never thought a junior hockey player in Saskatchewan named Logan Boulet would motivate me to finally become an organ donor," Jeff Vallance of Alberta wrote on Twitter. "He saved 6 lives. Took 4 minutes. You can do it as well."

For many Canadians on an organ transplant waiting list, the increase is an encouraging sign.

While almost all Canadians support the cause of organ donation, just 20% of the country is actually registered as donors. In a country where 4,500 people are waiting on life-saving organs, the surge in sign-ups is welcome.

Americans waiting on the organ transplant list face a similar predicament. More than 116,000 people are waiting on an organ transplant in the U.S., according to the Department of Health and Human Services. More registrations now will save lives in the months and years to come.

Watch a report on Boulet's story from the CBC's The National below:

To learn more about becoming an organ donor in the U.S., visit the Department of Health and Human Services website.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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via Anthony Crider / Flickr

Dozens of "White Lives Matter" rallies were scheduled to take place across America on Sunday. The events were scheduled in semi-private, encrypted chats on the Telegram app between Nazis, Proud Boys, and other right-wing extremists.

The organizers said the rallies would make "the whole world tremble."

However, the good news is that hardly any white supremacists showed up. In fact, the vast majority of people who did show up were counter-protesters.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less