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One Of The Biggest Racial Injustices Of Our Time, As Told By Those Living It

A grand jury will soon rule on whether Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson will be charged in the shooting of 18-year-old Mike Brown. The people of Ferguson, Missouri, would like you to understand why this is so important. People often ask, "What do the citizens of Ferguson want?" Here is a pretty clear answer. It's a really thoughtful conversation about what is happening all over our country and what needs to happen to prevent this from happening ever again. (Also, yes, that is "Grey's Anatomy" star Jesse Williams saying lots of great things in the middle of this.) Here's what you need to know. (You can scroll down to the bottom to get straight to the video.)

DISCLOSURE: I am white. If you are white and this story makes you uncomfortable, I urge you to fight the urge to close this window and to read the whole story. It's not racist to feel challenged and awkward in thinking about these issues. It is depressing, though, if you can't muster the strength to get a different perspective than your own. I would urge you to really listen, hear the whole thing, get a fresh perspective, and consider ALL the facts.

The people of Ferguson have a reasonable request:


The self-defense law in Missouri makes this a challenge since it is not very strict. But the citizens of Ferguson deserve to see him given the opportunity to plead his case in a court of his own peers.

It's more complex than just Mike Brown, though.

That's a real thing. Local police kill 400 black people a year nationwide. Police kill young black men at a rate 21 times higher than young white men. (And that's only data from reported shootings. Police reporting of officer-involved shootings is optional, and many don't report their statistics.)

People keep dying in Ferguson and St. Louis.

Kim King "strangled herself" while in police custody, Kajieme Powell was shot in front of witnesses, and Vonderrit Meyers had either a gun or a sandwich when he was shot by police all within the St. Louis and Ferguson area.

Putting Darren Wilson on trial has the potential of getting justice for his family, but justice for Mike Brown isn't the only thing they want.

You can watch the video to learn more.

If you have the time, listen to the kid who says something really angry at the beginning — because what he says at the end is really important and pretty damn profound.

A better tomorrow isn't enough.

In the months since Mike Brown was shot, there's been lots of speculation and backseat driving from people across the political spectrum trying to determine Darren Wilson's guilt or innocence. And while finding out the truth about it is incredibly important, an equally important conversation is about the system in which this tragedy occurred in the first place.

I want to believe that cops are here to protect us. And the best way for them to earn that trust is to learn a new way to police that doesn't do more harm than good. If you think there's more to this than just taking a side, if you think that we maybe should have a grown-up conversation about how to end systemic discrimination by people in authority, I'd appreciate you sharing this.

Sponsored

3 organic recipes that feed a family of 4 for under $7 a serving

O Organics is the rare brand that provides high-quality food at affordable prices.

A woman cooking up a nice pot of pasta.

Over the past few years, rising supermarket prices have forced many families to make compromises on ingredient quality when shopping for meals. A recent study published by Supermarket News found that 41% of families with children were more likely to switch to lower-quality groceries to deal with inflation.

By comparison, 29% of people without children have switched to lower-quality groceries to cope with rising prices.

Despite the current rising costs of groceries, O Organics has enabled families to consistently enjoy high-quality, organic meals at affordable prices for nearly two decades. With a focus on great taste and health, O Organics offers an extensive range of options for budget-conscious consumers.

O Organics launched in 2005 with 150 USDA Certified Organic products but now offers over 1,500 items, from organic fresh fruits and vegetables to organic dairy and meats, organic cage-free certified eggs, organic snacks, organic baby food and more. This gives families the ability to make a broader range of recipes featuring organic ingredients than ever before.


“We believe every customer should have access to affordable, organic options that support healthy lifestyles and diverse shopping preferences,” shared Jennifer Saenz, EVP and Chief Merchandising Officer at Albertsons, one of many stores where you can find O Organics products. “Over the years, we have made organic foods more accessible by expanding O Organics to every aisle across our stores, making it possible for health and budget-conscious families to incorporate organic food into every meal.”

With some help from our friends at O Organics, Upworthy looked at the vast array of products available at our local store and created some tasty, affordable and healthy meals.

Here are 3 meals for a family of 4 that cost $7 and under, per serving. (Note: prices may vary by location and are calculated before sales tax.)

O Organic’s Tacos and Refried Beans ($6.41 Per Serving)

Few dishes can make a family rush to the dinner table quite like tacos. Here’s a healthy and affordable way to spice up your family’s Taco Tuesdays.

Prep time: 2 minutes

Cook time: 20 minutes

Total time: 22 minutes

Ingredients:

1 lb of O Organics Grass Fed Ground Beef ($7.99)

1 packet O Organics Taco Seasoning ($2.29)

O Organics Mexican-Style Cheese Blend Cheese ($4.79)

O Organics Chunky Salsa ($3.99)

O Organics Taco Shells ($4.29)

1 can of O Organics Refried Beans ($2.29)

Instructions:

1. Cook the ground beef in a skillet over medium heat until thoroughly browned; remove any excess grease.

2. Add 1 packet of taco seasoning to beef along with water [and cook as directed].

3. Add taco meat to the shell, top with cheese and salsa as desired.

4. Heat refried beans in a saucepan until cooked through, serve alongside tacos, top with cheese.

tacos, o organics, family recipesO Organics Mexican-style blend cheese.via O Organics

O Organics Hamburger Stew ($4.53 Per Serving)

Busy parents will love this recipe that allows them to prep in the morning and then serve a delicious, slow-cooked stew after work.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 7 hours

Total time: 7 hours 15 minutes

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 lb of O Organics Grass Fed Ground Beef ($7.99)

1 ½ lbs O Organics Gold Potatoes ($4.49)

3 O Organics Carrots ($2.89)

1 tsp onion powder

I can O Organics Tomato Paste ($1.25)

2 cups water

1 yellow onion diced ($1.00)

1 clove garlic ($.50)

1 tsp salt

1/4 tsp pepper

2 tsp Italian seasoning or oregano

Instructions:

1. Cook the ground beef in a skillet over medium heat until thoroughly browned; remove any excess grease.

2. Transfer the cooked beef to a slow cooker with the potatoes, onions, carrots and garlic.

3. Mix the tomato paste, water, salt, pepper, onion powder and Italian seasoning in a separate bowl.

4. Drizzle the mixed sauce over the ingredients in the slow cooker and mix thoroughly.

5. Cover the slow cooker with its lid and set it on low for 7 to 8 hours, or until the potatoes are soft. Dish out into bowls and enjoy!

potatoes, o organics, hamburger stewO Organics baby gold potatoes.via O Organics


O Organics Ground Beef and Pasta Skillet ($4.32 Per Serving)

This one-pan dish is for all Italian lovers who are looking for a saucy, cheesy, and full-flavored comfort dish that takes less than 30 minutes to prepare.

Prep time: 2 minutes

Cook time: 25 minutes

Total time: 27 minutes

Servings: 4

Ingredients:

1 lb of O Organics Grass Fed Ground Beef ($7.99)

1 tbsp. olive oil

2 tsp dried basil

1 tsp garlic powder

1 can O Organics Diced Tomatoes ($2.00)

1 can O Organics Tomato Sauce ($2.29)

1 tbsp O Organics Tomato Paste ($1.25)

2 1/4 cups water

2 cups O Organics Rotini Pasta ($3.29)

1 cup O Organics Mozzarella cheese ($4.79)

Instructions:

1. Brown ground beef in a skillet, breaking it up as it cooks.

2. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and garlic powder

3. Add tomato paste, sauce and diced tomatoes to the skillet. Stir in water and bring to a light boil.

4. Add pasta to the skillet, ensuring it is well coated. Cover and cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

5. Remove the lid, sprinkle with cheese and allow it to cool.

o organics, tomato basil pasta sauce, olive oilO Organics tomato basil pasta sauce and extra virgin olive oil.via O Organics

This could be the guest house.


Inequality has gotten worse than you think.

An investigation by former "Daily Show" correspondent Hasan Minhaj is still perfectly apt and shows that the problem isn't just your classic case of "the rich get richer and the poor get poorer."


As much as we hear about wealth inequality these days, one disparity remains mostly ignored: the gap between the wealthy and the ridiculously wealthy.

Minhaj spoke to Richard Reeves, an economist with the Brookings Institute, who painted a dark picture:

wealth, comedy, Hasan Minhaj

Wealth inequality on the rise.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

The study Reeves refers to points to the growing wealth of the top 10th of the top 1%:

"The rise of wealth inequality is almost entirely due to the rise of the top 0.1% wealth share, from 7% in 1979 to 22% in 2012 — a level almost as high as in 1929. The bottom 90% wealth share first increased up to the mid-1980s and then steadily declined."

And no one's paid any attention.

Between the cries of the 45.3 million people in poverty and a dwindling middle class inevery state, the voice of the average millionaire is all but drowned out.

the one percent, inequality, investment

Millionaires unconcerned with financial disparity.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

But not all millionaires are worried about growing inequality in the top 1%.

In his search for a concerned millionaire, Minhaj met Morris Pearl, a retired investment banking director and member of an organization called The Patriotic Millionaires. Minhaj was baffled by what Pearl had to say:

resources, rich, Ronald Reagan

Investment banking pays well.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

What about trickle-down economics?

Trickle-down theory was popularized under Ronald Reagan's presidency. The idea was that clearing a path for the rich to make more money would spur more private investment, which would lead to more jobs and higher wages for all workers.

tax breaks, income, classism

Attempting the preach the reverse.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

Reagan put trickle-down theory into practice in two basic ways: by lowering taxes for the wealthy and by freezing wages for the poor.

In 1981, he cut the top marginal income tax rate — which only applies to the highest-income households — from 70% to 50%. Then in 1986, he more than doubled-down by slashing the rate to 28%. (The current rate is 39.6%.) And under Reagan's leadership, the minimum wage was frozen, even as costs of living were rising.

Pearl and other so-called Patriotic Millionaires think top one-percenters like themselves should pay more taxes.

trickle-down theory, financial institutions, comedy show

Making rich people richer.

All GIFs via Comedy Central.

Not only that, they believe raising the minimum wage is critical to reducing inequality.

OK, maybe not everyone — including millionaires — are convinced that giving more money to the rich will fix the economy. So why do our policies do just the opposite?


This article originally appeared on 3.23.15

Images provided by P&G

Three winners will be selected to receive $1000 donated to the charity of their choice.

True

Doing good is its own reward, but sometimes recognizing these acts of kindness helps bring even more good into the world. That’s why we’re excited to partner with P&G again on the #ActsOfGood Awards.

The #ActsOfGood Awards recognize individuals who actively support their communities. It could be a rockstar volunteer, an amazing community leader, or someone who shows up for others in special ways.

Do you know someone in your community doing #ActsOfGood? Nominate them between April 24th-June 3rdhere.Three winners will receive $1,000 dedicated to the charity of their choice, plus their story will be highlighted on Upworthy’s social channels. And yes, it’s totally fine to nominate yourself!

We want to see the good work you’re doing and most of all, we want to help you make a difference.

While every good deed is meaningful, winners will be selected based on how well they reflect Upworthy and P&G’s commitment to do #ActsOfGood to help communities grow.

That means be on the lookout for individuals who:

Strengthen their community

Make a tangible and unique impact

Go above and beyond day-to-day work

The #ActsOfGood Awards are just one part of P&G’s larger mission to help communities around the world to grow. For generations, P&G has been a force for growth—making everyday products that people love and trust—while also being a force for good by giving back to the communities where we live, work, and serve consumers. This includes serving over 90,000 people affected by emergencies and disasters through the Tide Loads of Hope mobile laundry program and helping some of the millions of girls who miss school due to a lack of access to period products through the Always #EndPeriodPoverty initiative.

Visit upworthy.com/actsofgood and fill out the nomination form for a chance for you or someone you know to win. It takes less than ten minutes to help someone make an even bigger impact.

May we all have this much fun at our job.

People are applauding one Amazon worker for delivering some delightful comedy along with some packages.

Erin Noyes, an artist who creates the most adorable miniature unicorn sculptures, shared the delightful moment her delivery guy decided to have some fun with the doorbell camera.

The footage, pasted to Noyes' TikTok page, shows the doorbell sounding off an automated “you’re currently being recorded.”

Without missing a beat, the worker quips, "Hi, I currently don't care!” and it only gets better from there.

The man then flexes his arms toward the camera, and with full bravado yells “BECAUSE I’M AMAZON” like he's making a WWE debut.

“Fedex don’t look like this! Fedex ain't built like this!” he continues, showing off the guns once more before taking off.

"I was simply expecting some art supplies for my art business, and instead, I was delivered SO much more,” Noyes wrote in her video’s caption.

@whisperfillies When I was simply expecting some supplies for my art business, and instead I was delivered SO much more 😂. FedEx don’t look like this! #amazon #amazonfinds #amazonprime #prime #fedex #happymail #gymlife #fitnessmotivation#artistsoninstagram #amazondriver #ringdoorbell #sculptor #fantasyartist #gymrat #gymaddict #gymlife ♬ original sound - Erin Noyes

Viewers were equally in love with the video, which has racked up nearly 26 million views.

“This needs to be an Amazon commercial,” one person petitioned.

Another wrote, “You ordered the entertaining package,” to which Noyes replied, “I need to figure out how to order it again.”

Probably no one comes face to face with doorbell cams as much as delivery workers, so it makes sense that a few have learned to incorporate them into their routine. Back in 2022, another Amazon driver used it to alert a house that it had no visible address markers, which could have been a serious safety concern.

Of course, doorbell cameras have caught all kinds of candid moments—not just those from delivery drivers. People have used them to share heartfelt advice, give lighthearted pregnancy updates to neighbors, show what default parenting looks like on a regular basis, and so much more. This might not have been the technology’s original purpose, but it sure is a wholesome perk, and one that’s bound to keep on coming.

It's rare enough to capture one antler being shed

For those not well versed in moose facts, the shedding of antlers is normally a fairly lengthy process. It happens only once a year after mating season and usually consists of a moose losing one antler at a time.

It’s incredibly rare for a bull moose to lose both at the same time—and even more rare that someone would actually catch it on film.

That’s why shed hunter (yes, that’s a real term) and woodsman Derek Burgoyne calls his footage of the phenomenon a “one-in-a-million” shot.



According to The Guardian, Burgoyne was flying his drone through a remote patch of forest in Canada when he spotted three moose in a clearing. His drone followed one of the bulls, who began doing the wobbly little shake thing that signals these antlers are going bye-bye.

Burgoyne knew he had to keep his camera on the moment—but he had no idea that he’d hit the jackpot.

Watch below:

It’s hard to tell which is more fun to watch— the super rare moment in nature or Burgoyne’s pure passion for his hobby.

“I shook a little bit. It was an adrenaline rush for sure,“ he told CBC News, sharing that he has previously found hundreds of shed antlers in his life.

Antler hunting has become a hot and profitable pastime over the past few years, although Burgoyne affirms that his shed hunting ambitions are born from a desire for well-being, not monetary gain.

“I enjoy being in the woods. It’s great exercise and it’s fun tracking the moose through the winter and looking for their sheds in the spring. Each one you find feels like the first one. It never gets old,” he told The Guardian.

Well Derek Burgoyne, thank you for doing what you love. Thanks to your passion, we too can share this once-in-a-lifetime moment. Here’s to good moose news!


This article originally appeared on 1.20.23

Some American tourists enjoying the sights

Americans have a style and personality all their own, which isn’t a bad thing. It’s just noticeable when they travel aboard. Americans often stand out because of their outgoing personalities. They are friendly and enjoy having casual conversations with strangers.

This is an endearing trait to a lot of people in more reserved cultures, although it can also come off as a little brash.

An American characteristic that isn’t quite endearing to people in other countries is that they can be rather loud. In Europe, one can always notice the Americans in the restaurant because they can be heard from across the room.


A Reddit user named Frosty-Ad3575 wanted to know the specific ways that Americans stand out when traveling abroad, so they asked the AskReddit subforum: “What’s an obvious sign that someone is an American?”

The post was popular, receiving nearly 6,000 responses in just 6 days. The most popular ones described how Americans' unique personalities, style of dress, dental hygiene and body language make them easy to spot.

Here are 14 “obvious” signs that someone is an American.

1. Posture

"Apparently, the CIA trains American agents to not lean on things if they go undercover in foreign countries because Americans lean on anything they can while standing around." — Clown1998

"I bet MI6 trains British agents to lean on everything if they go undercover in America because Americans lean on anything they can while standing around." — KingoftheMongoose

2. The date

"MMDDYYYY." — LowRevolution6175

3. Distances are different

"Anything under 4 hours is 'close by.'" — Grey-Canary

"Everything in Europe is around the corner if you're from the US. I can drive the whole day and not leave my state, but in Europe, I can pass through 4 countries in that same time frame." — JayHitter

4. They're polite to servers

"In the touristy cafe-restaurant I worked at:

If they asked me for the nicest spot we had

If they asked me my recommendation without seeing the menu first

I would walk to the table, and they would say right away ‘hey, how are you doing?’ This one threw me off a lot at first. Why is this person asking me how I'm doing?? I'm just there to take the order. I got used to it, and I think they found my awkwardness cute.

They would ask my name when I greeted them and took their order.

I'm Northern European." — Muc_99

"It’s under-appreciated just how polite, friendly, and sincere Americans are in general. It blew my mind the first time I came to the US, and I love that my children are growing up with those same values." — Irishweather5000


5. The water bottles

"I was told, 'Americans carry water bottles around like they're worried they'll never have access to clean water ever again.'" — Kosher_Dill

"I don't care what anyone says. If you think carrying a water bottle when walking a lot is weird, you're probably slightly dehydrated all the time and are just desensitized to it. You seriously need to drink water frequently if you want to be ideally healthy." — Tan11

6. Smiling

"I was in Germany this past summer, and I realized smiling at everyone you make eye contact with is very American. When I went to London on the same trip, they seemed less weirded out by it but would awkwardly return the smile. I was taught to always start with a disarming smile. Never realized it was American." — 12ozFitz

7. "More ice, please."

"I spent a year in Europe completely iceless to the point I forgot that was a thing. I stopped at a bar in Chicago fresh off the plane and not only did I get free tap water, but water with ice. I instantly felt at home." — Outside-Crezz8119

8. Personal space

"As an American man, I’ve been told repeatedly by European and Asian friends that we simply take up space (not by being fat) as though we’re entitled to it. Men in other countries apparently don’t claim the same personal space we do." — Potomacan

9. White teeth

"It’s even more bizarre that they assume we have braces or bleach our teeth because they’re straight and white. I have naturally straight white teeth. I brush them twice a day so they stay white. I don’t do anything special to them, but I remember being in London and some similar-aged students literally making fun of me for my teeth… it’s true that they don’t naturally look like headstones in an ancient graveyard, but there’s no need to make fun." — DPretilloZbornak

10. Casual dress

"My friend went to Germany recently, and what people said about Americans is you can spot them a mile away because they’re the ones wearing pajamas in public. Apparently, in other countries, at least Germany, they dress a little more formally and in less baggy clothes than we do in America." — MarcusWahlbezius

11. Baseball hats

"Baseball cap... even on an infant riding in a pram." — SyntheticOne

12. Shoes

"Americans are shoe snobs (they don’t think they are, but they are). Setting aside wealthier business types, Americans generally wear more on-brand, on-trend, high-quality shoes than others." — Mouflony

13. They're loud

"That was my first thought. Americans yell at each other in normal conversation in public. I noticed it years ago in Europe, and now I can’t stand it in the US." — SucccotashOther277

14. Occupation matters

"Immediately asking someone what they do for a living when meeting them. Our jobs and work are our entire identity." — Bealzu

"I hate that about American culture. I'm an American and recently became a SAHM, so I don't have an answer to 'What do you do for a living?' Half the time, I add the caveat, ‘Oh, my last job was with Apple,’ so that I'm not written off as an unemployed ‘loser.’ But it really is dumb to determine a person's worth by what they do in order to afford food and shelter." — WassupSassySasquatch


This article originally appeared on 1.4.24

A photo taken at a Costco food court in Japan.

Few Costco staples are as well loved as its food court. Though the selection consists of simple fast food, certain dishes have become culinary icons—not least of which being the famously unchanged $1.50 hot dog and soda combo meal. And when certain fan favorites exit the menu…oh boy.

Costco food courts are such a hot discussion topic among shoppers that recently an entire Reddit thread was dedicated to exploring different Costco food courts around the world. It’s both interesting to take and look at some of the differences, and soothing to know that no matter where you are in the world…affordable food options await.


England

Food Court Menu- Yorkshire, England
byu/The2ndenlightenment inCostco

As would be expected, this food court offers a very similar selection to that in the US. Soft-serve ice cream, pizza, baked chicken…the usual.

But an American would never expect to see “jacket potato” on the menu, which is the UK name for a baked potato. Plus the toppings are a bit exotic. I don’t know about you, but I’ve never considered piling baked beans or tuna on top of a cooked spud.

This Costco food court also sells the mango smoothie that went viral on TikTok but still only made a short lived debut in America. Or you could be extra fancy and get a gelato cone. Yum.

And in case you were wondering. Yes, there’s a hot dog combo meal. It averages out to about $1.90 USD.

Korea

Korean Costco food court menu
byu/kindofharmless inCostco

Here you can still get the hot dog combo meal (for about $147 USD), but it will be an all-pork hot dog rather than the standard all-beef one. But you’ll probably just go for the churros, since (tragically) these are a rare commodity in the US.

But if you’re feeling adventurous, go for a strawberry latte, bulgogi pizza or a bowl of mushroom soup. Or all three!

Iceland

Food court menu in Iceland
byu/UrLocalTroll inCostco

Here the hot dog meal is a wee bit more pricey (around $2.18 USD), but that’s still cheaper than the $8 cheeseburger.

However, the real talked about menu item is the “mexican baka,” which one commenter explained was “like a burrito with pizza dough.” Sold!

Japan

The Food Court Line up Today in Tokyo!
byu/PlatformFrequent4052 inCostco

Feast on bulgogi bakes, shrimp katsu burgers, cold brew coffees, clam chowder and perhaps the cheapest hot dog combo in the world at $1.15 USD.

Canada

Updated Canadian Food Court menu
byu/thermal7 inCostco

Anyone who has been to both a Canadian and an American Costco will tell you that there are a few key differences between the two locations, including the food courts.

For one thing, the Canadian Costco sells french fries—arguably one of the most American foods ever, which makes it surprising that it’s not on the American Costco menu. Some guessed that that was because the American locations don’t have deep fryers installed.

Just imagine having some fries to go with that $1.50 hot dog meal. Or a Polish hot dog, if you prefer (another item only available at Canadian Costcos).

That’s just a small sampling of what some Costcos have to offer worldwide. While they all have something that makes them unique, the budget-friendly hotdog meal goes largely unchanged no matter what. Perhaps there shouldn't be comfort in that, but there is.