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MUST WATCH: The video CNBC tried to hide from the Internet. They probably shouldn't have done that.

Elizabeth Warren went on CNBC and was so knowledgeable that her interview went viral. She has one of the most impressive resumes in financial politics. She's a wonk. She knows her facts. And her hosts aren't used to having people like her challenging them. After we helped make it go viral, CNBC filed a copyright complaint against her. (I've listed other senators who haven't been accused of piracy for the same practice below the video.) It gets amazing at 2:08. At 3:42, she uses their words against them. And at 4:39, she reminds me of Aragorn in "The Lord of the Rings," because I'm a giant nerd.

MUST WATCH: The video CNBC tried to hide from the Internet. They probably shouldn't have done that.

UPDATE: CNBC pulled the video for "copyright violations" from Sen. Warren's YouTube channel. They have the longer segment here at their site.

UPDATE 2: CNBC reached out to comment, and had the following to say:


"Again, we think that the clip featuring Senator Warren is well worth watching which is why it has been available to view in multiple locations on CNBC.com since its original posting. The original, copyrighted video clip, like all others on CNBC.com, can be embedded on any third party site through our video player."

Unfortunately, their embed system doesn't work on mobile and tends to break sites, so I've made them aware of the issue. They have graciously uploaded the clip to their YouTube channel to accommodate us and you can watch it below. I start it from when the original clip started, but you can rewind and hear everything Sen. Warren had to say prior to clip start by clicking on the start of the timeline.

However, this raises a larger question. Aren't senators allowed to share clips of themselves on TV? What provoked them to pull this specific post down? I would think that would be a case of fair use.

I've written to the CNBC team and will update when/if they respond again.

In the interim, I've decided to be a good neighbor to CNBC and find some other copyright pirates for them. Like Sen. Roberts, or Sen. Crapo, or Sen. Burr, or Sen. Moran, or Sen. Landrieu, or Sen. Sanders, or Sen. Rubio, or Sen. Barrasso, or Sen. Blunt, or Sen. Portman, or Sen. McConnell, or Sen. Reed, or Sen. Shelby, or Sen. Merkley, or Sen. McCain, or Sen. Johnson, or Sen. Ayotte, or Sen. Voinovich, or Sen. Carper, or that dastardly Sen. Warren.

CNBC's Jim Cramer tweeted about the interview and seemed to counter his own network's concerns about its caliber.

So why did they take it down leaving all those others there?

Speaking of which, I sure am a fan of said Sen. Warren. You could share this if you think that maybe people on TV should learn facts before talking about things they don't understand. Totally up to you.

If you click the tweet button below, you can ask CNBC why they filed a copyright claim against a senator for simply engaging in lively and thoughtful debate.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.