+
More

MUST WATCH: The video CNBC tried to hide from the Internet. They probably shouldn't have done that.

Elizabeth Warren went on CNBC and was so knowledgeable that her interview went viral. She has one of the most impressive resumes in financial politics. She's a wonk. She knows her facts. And her hosts aren't used to having people like her challenging them. After we helped make it go viral, CNBC filed a copyright complaint against her. (I've listed other senators who haven't been accused of piracy for the same practice below the video.) It gets amazing at 2:08. At 3:42, she uses their words against them. And at 4:39, she reminds me of Aragorn in "The Lord of the Rings," because I'm a giant nerd.

UPDATE: CNBC pulled the video for "copyright violations" from Sen. Warren's YouTube channel. They have the longer segment here at their site.

UPDATE 2: CNBC reached out to comment, and had the following to say:


"Again, we think that the clip featuring Senator Warren is well worth watching which is why it has been available to view in multiple locations on CNBC.com since its original posting. The original, copyrighted video clip, like all others on CNBC.com, can be embedded on any third party site through our video player."

Unfortunately, their embed system doesn't work on mobile and tends to break sites, so I've made them aware of the issue. They have graciously uploaded the clip to their YouTube channel to accommodate us and you can watch it below. I start it from when the original clip started, but you can rewind and hear everything Sen. Warren had to say prior to clip start by clicking on the start of the timeline.

However, this raises a larger question. Aren't senators allowed to share clips of themselves on TV? What provoked them to pull this specific post down? I would think that would be a case of fair use.

I've written to the CNBC team and will update when/if they respond again.

In the interim, I've decided to be a good neighbor to CNBC and find some other copyright pirates for them. Like Sen. Roberts, or Sen. Crapo, or Sen. Burr, or Sen. Moran, or Sen. Landrieu, or Sen. Sanders, or Sen. Rubio, or Sen. Barrasso, or Sen. Blunt, or Sen. Portman, or Sen. McConnell, or Sen. Reed, or Sen. Shelby, or Sen. Merkley, or Sen. McCain, or Sen. Johnson, or Sen. Ayotte, or Sen. Voinovich, or Sen. Carper, or that dastardly Sen. Warren.

CNBC's Jim Cramer tweeted about the interview and seemed to counter his own network's concerns about its caliber.

So why did they take it down leaving all those others there?

Speaking of which, I sure am a fan of said Sen. Warren. You could share this if you think that maybe people on TV should learn facts before talking about things they don't understand. Totally up to you.

If you click the tweet button below, you can ask CNBC why they filed a copyright claim against a senator for simply engaging in lively and thoughtful debate.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

Keep ReadingShow less

The way makers use time makes meetings far more disruptive than they are for managers.

Most people don't look at their work calendar on any given day and say, "Yay! I have a meeting!" Most of us just understand and accept that meetings are a part of work life in most industries.

Some people, however, are far more negatively impacted by scheduled meetings than others. For people involved in creating or producing, meetings are actively disruptive to work in a way that isn't often the case for managers.

A viral post with an explanation from Paul Graham breaks down why.

Keep ReadingShow less
Pop Culture

Moms rally around Chrissy Teigen after she cautiously announces pregnancy two years after a loss

"I don’t think I’ll ever walk out of an appointment with more excitement than nerves but so far, everything is perfect and beautiful and I’m feeling hopeful and amazing."

Chrissy Teigen announces pregnancy.

Losing a baby is a tragedy at any stage of pregnancy, but losing a baby later in pregnancy can feel that much more devastating. Getting pregnant after loss is extremely anxiety-inducing, so when Chrissy Teigan cautiously announced she was pregnant with her fourth child, mothers who have experienced pregnancy loss collectively shared her apprehension.

Keep ReadingShow less