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Modern-day human slavery takes many forms. Here are 3 of them.

Modern-day human slavery takes many forms.

Modern-day human slavery takes many forms. Here are 3 of them.

What do the terms "human slavery" and "human trafficking" mean to you?

When I think of human trafficking and slavery, the first thing that comes to mind is people being kidnapped and sold into the sex and labor trades. That definitely happens, and it's absolutely horrible. It needs to stop.

But there are also other forms, where people voluntarily agree to take what's presented to them as a job. It's usually an opportunity for a better life and much-needed income. They go willingly — at first. And then once they arrive at their new place of employment, often in another city, state, or country, they quickly learn that they're not free to leave and either the "job" doesn't pay or it's not even the "job" they were promised. Women can end up as involuntary sex workers, for example, when they thought they were taking a job as a housekeeper.


Human trafficking is a big business that happens all over the world.

There's a lot of illegal money being made buying, selling, and exploiting humans — about $32 billion a year. Over $15 billion of that comes from industrialized countries, including the United States.

Make no mistake: People are being held against their will and forced to perform labor, from domestic work to prostitution, in the U.S. Human trafficking and slavery isn't a "third-world problem." It happens in greater numbers in developing countries, but it also happens in developed ones.

Watch three common scenarios about how people are duped into becoming human slaves.

These three fictional people became human slaves when they were tricked into taking "jobs" that turned out not to be jobs at all. It's helpful for us all to understand how human trafficking works.

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

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