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Moby is taking his love of animals to a whole other level with his restaurant.

Moby's Little Pine restaurant is unique in the coolest of ways.

Moby is taking his love of animals to a whole other level with his restaurant.

Splurging at the new Little Pine restaurant in L.A. can be a seriously guilt-free experience.

You're boosting local business, you're eating eco-friendly, organic foods, and — as was just announced on Jan. 5, 2016 — you're supporting a restaurant that's giving away every last cent of its profits to animal welfare groups.


Photo courtesy of Little Pine restaurant/Wagstaff Worldwide, used with permission.

Who's the benevolent genius behind this do-good business model? Singer-songwriter Moby, of course.

Moby's Little Pine restaurant has only been open about two months. But the Los Angeles bistro — already bucking the trend by being 100% organic and vegan — is breaking the mold even more by donating all of its profits (beyond revenue needed to keep the restaurant running) to organizations like the Humane Society of the United States, Farm Sanctuary, the Animal Legal Defense Fund, and many others, according to a statement provided to Upworthy.

It's what Moby's had in mind for his restaurant all along.


Photo by Araya Diaz/Getty Images for The Art of Elysium.

"Opening Little Pine was never meant to be a conventional entrepreneurial endeavor," the musician said. "I want it to present veganism in a really positive light, and also help to support the animal welfare organizations who do such remarkable work."

A restaurant handing over its profits to charity is unconventional (to say the least), but it's probably not quite so surprising to those who've followed Moby's career.

He has a long history of giving back to causes near and dear to his heart, supporting grassroots activism in the political realm, helping nonprofit filmmakers succeed, and, yes — staying committed to protecting vulnerable animals.

Moby attends a "Stand Up for Pits" charity event in Los Angeles in 2013. Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

The groups supported by Little Pine restaurant help animals in a number of ways.

The Humane Society, for example, rescues thousands of animals every year who've been victimized by abusive owners or forced to live in puppy mills.

Farm Sanctuary not only works to house vulnerable creatures, but also actively fights factory farming — a thriving industry that exploits and abuses animals to maximize profits within our food production system.

And the Animal Legal Defense Fund? It helps ensure our furry friends have a voice in the justice system, holding abusers accountable for their violations and working to expand legal protections for animals in the courtroom.

Dining at Little Pine will help these groups — and so many others — protect animals for years to come.

So if you happen to be in L.A. and are in the mood for some guilt-free grub, now you know of a good place to go.

The food sounds delicious, your dining dollars are put toward a great cause, and I hear the owner's one helluva guy, too.

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