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Meet the Internet's most powerful warrior against ageism: Baddie Winkle.

Her bio reads: "Stealing your man since 1928." And that's just the beginning.

Meet the Internet's most powerful warrior against ageism: Baddie Winkle.

Baddie Winkle is just doing Baddie Winkle.

judging you
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


Ashley Hoffmand of Styleite called this 87-year-old Kentuckian's presence online "a tonic to women who fear judgment everywhere."

selfieee!!
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And thank heaven for that.


it's true
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


It all started with her great-granddaughter, Kennedy, who introduced Baddie to social media.

"Kennedy is responsible for all of this. Kennedy and I have a lot of fun together. We're very close ... she's my stylist. She helps me out a lot.

pre vmas!! @marinafini took this photo ๐Ÿ’ž
A photo posted by kennedy (@psychicbabe) on

Baddie and her great granddaughter Kennedy <3

"One day, I was laying out in the sun, and I put on some tie-dyed shirt and a pair of cutoff shorts of my [great-] granddaughter Kennedy's. She came home and said, 'Oh, Granny, you look so cute! Let me take a pic of you.'"

Peace and Love ๐ŸŒบ๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ’œ
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And the rest was history!

LOVE YOU @mileycyrus ๐Ÿ’š๐ŸŒˆ TUNE IN TONIGHT FOR THE VMAS ON @MTV
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

Even Miley is a fan.

The Internet was. in. love.

BLESSED
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

And can you blame us?

"I'm not an old person. I've never been an old person. I just do my thing," Baddie Winkle says.

Older people, like all human beings who fit into a certain category, are not all the same!

Grandmas can be this if they want.

Cool apron, Grandma! Image via George Eastman House/Flickr.

Or they can be this!

my back side is the best side
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


Baddie Winkle, whose real name is Helen Van Winkle, breaks the stereotype molds.

She's rocking bright colors and she's being herself.

Baddie โ€” in all her tie-dyed, 19-year-old-great-granddaughter-collaborating glory โ€” is so great. And at times ... especially when she's poking fun at the way the media typically shows older people ... hilarious.

life alert: caught the feels
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

LOL.

Just by having a good time and hangin' with her family, she's forcing many of us to reconsider what's "acceptable" ... not just for older folks, but for ourselves.

Let's admire her.

I LOVE @beautyconofficial ๐Ÿ’˜
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

She's not acting like anything but herself. She loves dressing up, working with her great-granddaughter, and being a role model.

"I don't like 'old women' clothes," she told Refinery29.

๐Ÿ„๐Ÿ”ฎ
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on


And she doesn't have time for haters.


She's too busy being her.


๐Ÿ’ฃ๐Ÿ“ฒ๐Ÿ’—
A photo posted by @baddiewinkle on

True individuals come in every age.

"You're only here once in your lifetime, so have fun."

Who's ready to call their grandma?

my fav person @baddiewinkle ๐ŸŒ™๐ŸŒธ๐Ÿ„๐ŸŒˆ๐Ÿ‘…
A photo posted by kennedy (@psychicbabe) on
Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

Keep Reading Show less
Image by 5540867 from Pixabay

Figuring out what to do for a mom on Mother's Day can be a tricky thing. There's the standard flowers or candy, of course, and taking her out to a nice brunch is a fairly universal winner. But what do moms really want?

Speaking from experienceโ€”my kids range from age 12 to 20โ€”a lot depends on the stage of motherhood. What I wanted when my kids were little is different than what I want now, and I'm sure when my kids are grown and gone I'll want something different again.

We asked our readers to share what they want for Mother's Day, and while the answers were varied, there were some common themes that emerged.

Moms of young kids want a break.

When your kids are little, motherhood is relentless. Precious and adorable, yes. Wonderful and rewarding, absolutely. But it's a LOT. And it's a lot all the fricking time.

Most moms I know would love the gift of alone time, either away at a hotel or Airbnb or in their own home with no one else around. Time alone is a priceless commodity at this stage, especially if it comes with someone else taking care of cleaning, making sure the kids are fed and safe and occupied, doing the laundry, etc.

This is especially true after more than a year of pandemic living, where we moms have spent more time than usual at home with our offspring. While in some ways that's been great, again, it's a lot.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Daniel Schludi on Unsplash
True

The global eradication of smallpox in 1980 is one of international public health's greatest successes. But in 1966, seven years after the World Health Organization announced a plan to rid the world of the disease, smallpox was still widespread. The culprits? A lack of funds, personnel and vaccine supply.

Meanwhile, outbreaks across South America, Africa, and Asia continued, as the highly contagious virus continued to kill three out of every 10 people who caught it, while leaving many survivors disfigured. It took a renewed commitment of resources from wealthy nations to fulfill the promise made in 1959.

Forty-one years later, although we face a different virus, the potential for vast destruction is just as great, and the challenges of funding, personnel and supply are still with us, along with last-mile distribution. Today, while 30% of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, with numbers rising every day, there is an overwhelming gap between wealthy countries and the rest of the world. It's becoming evident that the impact on the countries getting left behind will eventually boomerang back to affect us all.

Photo by ismail mohamed - SoviLe on Unsplash

The international nonprofit CARE recently released a policy paper that lays out the case for U.S. investment in a worldwide vaccination campaign. Founded 75 years ago, CARE works in over 100 countries and reaches more than 90 million people around the world through multiple humanitarian aid programs. Of note is the organization's worldwide reputation for its unshakeable commitment to the dignity of people; they're known for working hand-in-hand with communities and hold themselves to a high standard of accountability.

"As we enter into our second year of living with COVID-19, it has become painfully clear that the safety of any person depends on the global community's ability to protect every person," says Michelle Nunn, CARE USA's president and CEO. "While wealthy nations have begun inoculating their populations, new devastatingly lethal variants of the virus continue to emerge in countries like India, South Africa and Brazil. If vaccinations don't effectively reach lower-income countries now, the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be catastrophic."

Keep Reading Show less