Let's talk about the good stuff that happened this week, not the bad stuff.

Yes, a lot of bad things happened this week. We all know that. But so did a lot of great things!

A Philadelphia dance center held a daddy-daughter ballet class. A brave 19-year-old used his iPhone flashlight to save a young girl from a deadly house fire. A man in California has been single-handedly reviving a rare and beautiful species of butterfly in his backyard.

And that's not nearly all.


Here's a look at some of the wonderful things that happened this week. It'll make you feel good about the world again.

1. Pollution has gotten out of control in India, so Dehli banned all disposable plastic.

Sorry, floating bag from "American Beauty," this was the right move for our planet and should have a major impact on our oceans.

2. American Girl just released its first boy doll.

Image courtesy of American Girl.

Parents have been clamoring for more diversity from American Girl for years, and so in addition to Everett, the company's newest line will also feature a Hawaiian doll and a new black doll.

Boys play with dolls, too! Heck, yeah.

3. No longer the whitest show on television: Rachel Lindsay will be the first black "Bacehlorette."

GIF via The Bachelor

About. Damn. Time.

4. A city in Iowa is saving the bees!

City officials in Cedar Rapids are working to create a 1,000-acre "bee paradise" full of grasses and wildflowers to help rejuvenate dying populations of the crucial little pollinators.

5. But if that doesn't work, maybe these bee-like pollinating robots will.

An industrial design student in Georgia, Anna Haldewang, came up with a prototype for a tiny drone that may be able to mimic the important role bees play in keeping crops and plant-life thriving.

Man, young people are smart these days.

Image courtesy of Savannah College of Art and Design.

6. A father said his son with autism would only eat Star Wars macaroni and cheese, so William Shatner rallied the internet to help.

Kids with autism sometimes have trouble adapting to change, so when Reed Botwright ran out of his son's favorite dinner, he put out a call for help.

Okay, this is a bit of a call for help. I'm putting this out to the interwebz and social netz for some assistance. As...

Posted by Reed Botwright on Sunday, February 12, 2017

Then, William Shatner, aka Captain Kirk, did this and started an incredible domino chain of giving.

7. People in Ireland raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to send a girl to the U.S. for a rare and expensive cancer treatment.

Shauntelle Tynan's video pleading for people to help her raise the money she'd need to visit Houston, Texas, went massively viral. Her story struck a nerve in Ireland, whose people came together to raise a staggering 713,511 euros, or nearly $800,000, to help pay for treatment.

Me right now. GIF via 30 Rock.

8. A bunch of Sikh temples in California opened their doors and hearts to dam evacuees.

When the Oroville Dam in Northern California failed this past week, over 100,000 people were forced to evacuate. Lots of people stepped up to help with housing and shelter, including several Sikh temples in the area.

#LoveTrumpsHate

9. A school bus driver in Tennessee built a new ramp for a girl on his route with special needs.

She already had a wheelchair ramp at her house, but it didn't quite reach the bus. So Thomas Mitchell rounded up some buddies and built her a new one, no questions asked.

10. A high school student in Ohio handmade valentines for everyone in the school.

The girl, who has remained anonymous, spent months handfolding over a thousand origami hearts that say "You are loved."

On Valentine's Day, she and some friends placed them on every locker in the school.

Here is a follow up to an earlier post today sharing a random act of kindness by students at THS.This actually turned...

Posted by Troy High School on Tuesday, February 14, 2017

There's bound to be great news next week, too. You just have to look a little harder for it these days. But I promise you, it's worth it!

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