The Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue started in 1964. More than five decades later, it's by far the biggest-selling issue every year.


By more than 10 times.

As "Last Week Tonight" smartly points out, this decade was not really the best when it came to women. But still, 51 years later — long after Ms. magazine started, a woman's right to choose, and women gaining ground in the fight towards equality — men acting like this because of the swimsuit issue is still completely fine:

Like seriously, what is that?

How is talking like that to a woman, let alone when your wife is about to give birth, OK in today's age? In my opinion, the way that guy is talking to supermodel Kate Upton is exactly why we need to re-evaluate the way we value women today. Why can't we have more covers of Sports Illustrated with women like this:

And leave it at that?

Watch the full video below:

It is safe to say that the wise words of Muhammad Ali stands the test of time. Widely considered to be the greatest heavyweight boxer the world has ever seen, the legacy of Ali extends far beyond his pugilistic endeavors. Throughout his career, he spoke out about racial issues and injustices. The brash Mohammed Ali (or who we once knew as Cassius Clay) was always on point with his charismatic rhetoric— despite being considered arrogant at times. Even so, he had a perspective that was difficult to argue with.

As a massive boxing fan—and a huge Ali fan—I have never seen him more calm and to the point then in this recently posted BBC video from 1971. Although Ali died in 2016, at 74 years old, his courage inside and outside the ring is legendary. In this excerpt, Ali explained to Michael Parkinson about how he used to ask his mother about white representation. Even though the interview is nearly 50 years old, it shows exactly how far we need to come as a country on the issues of racial inclusion and equality.


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