Kim Cattrall's poignant, spot-on response to those still asking why she doesn't have kids.

Kim Cattrall is a celebrated actress with a remarkable career that spans four decades.

Though most of us know Cattrall from her work as confident PR maven Samantha Jones on HBO's "Sex and the City," the actress scored her first roles in TV movies before jumping to film roles in "Porky's" and "Police Academy" ahead of her breakout role in the 1987 film "Mannequin."


Photo by Francois Durand/Getty Images.

Her storied career aside, Cattrall's critics (who are apparently out of things to ask her) often ask why the 59-year-old star doesn't have children.

Cattrall was a guest editor on the BBC Radio 4's "Women's Hour" when she decided to address the issue.

In one fell swoop, the actress silenced her critics AND gave a new spin on what it means to be a mother.

Photo by Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images.

"I am not a biological parent, but I am a parent. I have young actors and actresses that I mentor; I have nieces and nephews that I am very close to. ... There is a way to become a mother in this day and age that doesn't include your name on the child's birth certificate. You know, you can express that maternal side of you very, very clearly, very strongly. ... It feels very satisfying."

Boom.

And Cattrall is not alone.

According to Census data, a record number of women are choosing not to have children.

In 2014, nearly 48% of women between the ages of 15 and 44 had never had kids. That's the highest percentage of women of those ages without children since the Census Bureau started tracking the statistic in the 1970s.

But the expectation to have kids is still there. Women who make the choice to forgo motherhood are slammed as selfish or immature. Entire articles are dedicated to the plethora of reasons women choose not to have kids, as if their decision warrants a longer explanation than "works for her, not for me."

Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images.

But apparently, even in 2015, even with numerous awards and a successful career to your name — and even with other things to talk about — this is still a choice women are expected to defend.

Hats off to Kim Cattrall for redefining motherhood.

Not just for herself, but for being a strong voice and advocate for the many women who choose a path other than raising children. It's not always an easy path to walk, but she does it with grace, grit, and undoubtedly in fabulous shoes.

Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for amfAR.

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Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

"Unfortunately," she says, "I took my bad relationship with me. At the time, I didn't realize it was so bad, much less, abusive. Seeing and hearing about abusive relationships while growing up gave me the mentality that it was just a normal way of life."

Those college years away from home were difficult for a lot of reasons. She had three small children — two in diapers, one in elementary school — as well as a full-time University class schedule and a part-time job as a housekeeper.

"I wore many masks back then and clothing that would cover the bruises," she remembers. "Despite the darkness that I was living in, I was a great student; I knew that no matter what, I HAD to succeed. I knew there was more to my future than what I was living, so I kept working hard."

While searching for an elective class during this time, she came across a one-credit, 20-hour IMPACT self-defense class that could be done over a weekend. That single credit changed her life forever. It helped give her the confidence to leave her abusive relationship and inspired her to bring IMPACT classes to other Native women in her community.

I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

"I was setting boundaries and people were either respecting them or not, but I was able to acknowledge who was worth keeping in my life and who wasn't," she says.

Following the class, she also joined a roller derby league where she met many other powerful women who inspired her — and during that summer, she found the courage to leave her abuser.

"As afraid as I was, I finally had the courage to report the abuse to legal authorities, and I had the support of friends and family who provided comfort for my children and I during this time," she says.

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One little girl took pictures of her school lunches. The Internet responded — and so did the school.

If you listened to traditional news media (and sometimes social media), you'd begin to think the Internet and technology are bad for kids. Or kids are bad for technology. Here's a fascinating alternative idea.

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Norton

This article originally appeared on 03.31.15

Kids can innovate, create, and imagine in ways that are fresh and inspiring — when we "allow" them to do so, anyway. Despite the tendency for parents to freak out because their kids are spending more and more time with technology in schools, and the tendency for schools themselves to set extremely restrictive limits on the usage of such technology, there's a solid argument for letting them be free to imagine and then make it happen.

It's not a stretch to say the kids in this video are on the cutting edge. Some of the results he talks about in the video at the bottom are quite impressive.

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