John Legend nailed why calling MS-13 gang members 'animals' is a problem.

President Trump referred to people as "animals" — and then doubled down, saying that he was only referring to certain people.

Trump's comment came during a roundtable discussion about sanctuary cities in California, after Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims described what she sees as a problem with current law enforcement and immigration policy.

Trump replied, "We have people coming into the country, or trying to come in — and we're stopping a lot of them — but we're taking people out of the country. You wouldn't believe how bad these people are. These aren't people. These are animals."


Many honed in on the president's words, accusing him of dehumanizing all undocumented immigrants from south of the border. The president clarified that he was specifically referring to those in MS-13 — gang members mostly from Central America, notorious for particularly brutal, violent crimes.

I.C.E. agents detain a suspected MS-13 gang member and Honduran immigrant. Photo by John Moore/Getty Images.

John Legend beautifully explained why it doesn't matter if the president was only dehumanizing violent gang members.

When Trump made these remarks, Legend and his wife, Chrissy Teigen, were in the hospital welcoming their new baby. Yet the singer still took a moment to explain why dehumanizing any group — even violent gang members — is problematic.  

"I'm in the hospital with our new son," he wrote on Twitter. "Any of these babies here could end up committing terrible crimes in the future. It's easy, once they've done so, to distance ourselves from their humanity."

[rebelmouse-image 19534645 dam="1" original_size="667x190" caption="Image via John Legend/Twitter." expand=1]Image via John Legend/Twitter.

‌‌The perspective one gets gazing at a brand-new human being, still unmarked by the world, is as about as pure as it gets.

Legend challenged us all to examine the root causes of violence and look for collective solutions.

"But it's much more honest and challenging to realize they were all babies once and think about what in society, their home life, etc. took them from baby to violent gang member," he continued, "and then to think about collective action we could take to mitigate these conditions."

He also noted our duty to examine the role U.S. policy may have played in the formation of MS-13 in the first place.

[rebelmouse-image 19534646 dam="1" original_size="676x323" caption="Image via John Legend/Twitter." expand=1]Image via John Legend/Twitter.

It's easy to create black-and-white, us-versus-them, good-versus-evil narratives.

It's harder to dig deep into what leads people to violence and contemplate how we could play a role in preventing it.

Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Without devolving into personal bashing, Legend pointed out a universal truth: As history has proven time and again, dehumanization of any group of people is a dangerous path.

[rebelmouse-image 19534649 dam="1" original_size="667x164" caption="Image via John Legend/Twitter." expand=1]Image via John Legend/Twitter.

What makes his comments so compelling is that he put forth his arguments and challenges ideas with a thoughtful nod to the complexity of the issue — and without disparaging anyone's ideology, political affiliation, or appearance.

Thank you, John Legend, for a refreshing example of how to engage in thoughtful and reasonable discourse, even within an undeniably divisive topic.

Jimmy Fallon #MyFamilyIsWeird.

It’s that time of year again, the holiday season is when we get the pleasure of spending way more time than we’re used to with our families. For those of us who’ve moved away from our immediate families, the holidays are a great time to reacquaint ourselves with old traditions and to realize that some of them may be a little strange.

Every family seems to have its own brand of weirdness. In fact, I wouldn’t trust anyone who says that their family is completely normal.

On November 18, “The Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon gave everyone a reason to celebrate their unique families by asking them to share their favorite stories under #MyFamilyIsWeird. The responses were everything from odd holiday traditions to family members that may have a screw (or two!) loose.

Here are 17 of the funniest responses.

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via TM on music / Twitter

This article originally appeared on 4.10.20 via The Conversation


Fifty years ago, when Paul McCartney announced he had left the Beatles, the news dashed the hopes of millions of fans, while fueling false reunion rumors that persisted well into the new decade.

In a press release on April 10, 1970 for his first solo album, "McCartney," he leaked his intention to leave. In doing so, he shocked his three bandmates.

The Beatles had symbolized the great communal spirit of the era. How could they possibly come apart?

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Cayce LaCorte explains why virginity doesn't exist.

The concept of virginity is a very loaded issue in American culture. If a woman loses hers when she's too young she can be slut-shamed. If a man remains a virgin for too long, he can be bullied for not being manly enough.

There is also a whole slew of religious mind games associated with virginity that can give people some serious psychological problems associated with sex.

Losing one's virginity has also been blown up way beyond proportion. It's often believed that it's a magical experience—it's usually not. Or that after having sex for the first time people can really start to enjoy living life—not the case.

What if we just dropped all of the stigmas surrounding virginity and instead, replaced them with healthy attitudes toward sex and relationships?

Writer Cayce LaCorte is going viral on TikTok for the simple way she's taught her five daughters to think about virginity. They don't have to. LaCorte shared her parenting ideas on TikTok in response to mom-influencer Nevada Shareef's question: "Name something about the way you raised your kids that people think is weird but you think is healthy."

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