More

Jimmy Kimmel asked a 2nd grader to explain trade to Trump. She didn't disappoint.

'Are trade deficits good or bad? They're both, Mr. President.'

Jimmy Kimmel asked a 2nd grader to explain trade to Trump. She didn't disappoint.

Managing global economics isn't for everyone.

It takes levelheadedness, a knack for diplomacy, and a basic understanding of math.


Unfortunately, if the recent tweets by businessman-turned-President Donald Trump are any indication, he may be lacking in all three.

On April 4, Trump tweeted that "when you're already $500 billion DOWN, you can't lose!"

The statement was in regards to the U.S. trade deficit. America's largest deficit, by country, is with China.

In recent weeks, Trump has escalated talks of a trade war with China, slapping a 25% tariff on several Chinese-made products on April 3. China retaliated by imposing its own tariffs on $50 billion-worth of American goods, including pork and soybeans.

Many economists say these moves will inevitably hurt workers in U.S. agricultural and manufacturing sectors — ironically, the same industries Trump vowed to protect.

The scary thing, as Jimmy Kimmel pointed out during the April 5 episode of his show, is that Trump doesn't seem to understand the complexities of trade.

“[Trump] seems to think that if one side has a deficit, that side is losing by $500 billion," Kimmel said, pointing to Trump's tweet. "That's not how trade deficits work."

So, on the off-chance Trump might be tuning in that night, the late night host asked a second-grader named Shiloh to explain the concept of trade deficits to the president.  

It was funny, adorable — and actually really informative, too. Check it out (story continues below):

It's OK — if global trade isn't your forte, I'll break down Shiloh's lesson.

"What is a trade deficit?" she began the video. "It sounds like a bad thing. But really, it's just the difference between how much we buy from another country and how much we sell to that country. So, if we buy more stuff from China than we sell to them, that's a trade deficit."

All GIFs via "Jimmy Kimmel Live!"/YouTube.

"But don't freak out," she assured viewers. "We didn't actually lose anything, because we have all the stuff we bought."

Despite the scary name, deficits can actually be a good thing, she explained — it often indicates a strong national economy and means we have more money on hand to spend.

"But there are problems," as she pointed out.

Trump's more populist, protectionist ideas have some merit. She said, "Some American workers lose their jobs making stuff if we buy that stuff from other countries." Those abroad who end up with those jobs may work under dangerous working conditions and get paid less than U.S. workers would have.

The moral of Shiloh's story?

Trade deficits are complicated. They result in both pros and cons for us in the U.S. And the totality of their effects can't be adequately summed up in a 280-character tweet.

"So, are trade deficits good or bad? They're both, Mr. President," Shiloh concluded. "If you have any other questions, let me know. Good luck."

True

Anne Hebert, a marketing writer living in Austin, TX, jokes that her closest friends think that her hobby is "low-key harassment for social good". She authors a website devoted entirely to People Doing Good Things. She's hosted a yearly canned food drive with up to 150 people stopping by to donate, resulting in hundreds of pounds of donations to take to the food bank for the past decade.

"I try to share info in a positive way that gives people hope and makes them aware of solutions or things they can do to try to make the world a little better," she said.

For now, she's encouraging people through a barrage of persistent, informative, and entertaining emails with one goal in mind: getting people to VOTE. The thing about emailing people and talking about politics, according to Hebert, is to catch their attention—which is how lice got involved.

"When my kids were in elementary school, I was class parent for a year, which meant I had to send the emails to the other parents. As I've learned over the years, a good intro will trick your audience into reading the rest of the email. In fact, another parent told me that my emails always stood out, especially the one that started: 'We need volunteers for the Valentine's Party...oh, and LICE.'"

Hebert isn't working with a specific organization. She is simply trying to motivate others to find ways to plug in to help get out the vote.

Photo by Phillip Goldsberry on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
via Emily Sophie / TikTok

A TikTok video is making the rounds because it continues to make people question their own senses. In the video, a voice can be heard saying either the word "brainstorm" or the words "green needle."

What you hear depends on what you're thinking about when you read the screen.

So, if you play it while thinking "green needle," that's what you'll hear in the clip. The same goes for "brainstorm." Then, go back and forth between the two. It's a surreal experience.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
True

Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

Keep Reading Show less
via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

In the post, she compared the color of her breast milk before and after the vaccination, to show how a baby's reaction to the vaccine has a direct effect on her mother's milk production.

Keep Reading Show less

As someone who has given birth to three children and who was raised by a labor-and-delivery nurse, you'd think I'd have a good handle on the physical mechanics of childbirth. But despite knowing all the terminology and experiencing all the details first hand—uterine contractions, cervical dilation, etc.—I'm a visual person, and most of the birth process happens internally. Feeling it and being told what's happening isn't the same as being able to visualize what's actually happening.

Enter high school teacher Brooke Bernal, who teaches consumer sciences. She shared a video on TikTok demonstrating how she teaches her students about childbirth, which she says is her "all time favorite lesson," using a balloon and a ping-pong ball. It's a simple, but-oh-so-helpful demonstration that even helped me get a better grip on the miracle of childbirth. (Without the baby shooting across the room at the end, of course.)

Keep Reading Show less