It's an area of feminism often overlooked. This pizza analogy nails it.

This incredibly clever video manages to highlight the problems within mainstream feminism without being condescending — and it uses pizza. What more could you ask for?

When we talk about women's issues, let's make sure we include all women.

It's super exciting to be living in an age when so many people are being exposed to feminism via the Internet. Whether through trending Twitter hashtags, blogs, memes, or YouTube videos, more and more people are learning what feminism is about and dispelling myths at the same time. And in recent years, even mainstream media has gotten on board, with commercials, films, and television shows featuring feminist themes.

But as with any good thing, there's room for improvement. And when it comes to feminist spaces and conversations both online and off, too often straight, white women are the focus, leaving tons of women out.


The solution? Intersectionality.

What the heck is "intersectionality"?

Intersectionality (or intersectionalism) is the study of intersections between forms or systems of oppression, domination or discrimination. ... This feminist sociological theory was first named by Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989, though the concept can be traced back to the 19th century. The theory suggests that — and seeks to examine how — various biological, social and cultural categories such as gender, race, class, ability, sexual orientation, religion, caste, species and other axes of identity interact on multiple and often simultaneous levels, contributing to systemic injustice and social inequality.
Wikipedia

Simply put, intersectionality looks at how different aspects of people influence their experiences with oppression and inequality. Check it out — I even made a handy Venn diagram to show how things like race, gender, sexuality, and physical ability overlap!



For example, when we're talking about women's issues, it's important to remember that the experiences of a straight, able-bodied white woman are going to be very different than the experiences of a gay, disabled black woman. Both women need feminism, but they also face different challenges and inequalities based on who they are.

Now that you have the basics, let's take this intersectionality crash course a bit further...

What if you used fast food to explain intersectionality in feminism?

Akilah Hughes' "Intersectional feminism and pizza" is the ultimate explanation for the importance of intersectionality, and she manages to tackle it with pizza. But before jumping into the video, here's a handy key to help you understand her delicious brilliance.


*WOC = women of color
*LBT = lesbian, bisexual, transgender

Alright, now that you're up to speed on how this analogy works, take a look at the video!


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