More

It's an area of feminism often overlooked. This pizza analogy nails it.

This incredibly clever video manages to highlight the problems within mainstream feminism without being condescending — and it uses pizza. What more could you ask for?

It's an area of feminism often overlooked. This pizza analogy nails it.

When we talk about women's issues, let's make sure we include all women.

It's super exciting to be living in an age when so many people are being exposed to feminism via the Internet. Whether through trending Twitter hashtags, blogs, memes, or YouTube videos, more and more people are learning what feminism is about and dispelling myths at the same time. And in recent years, even mainstream media has gotten on board, with commercials, films, and television shows featuring feminist themes.

But as with any good thing, there's room for improvement. And when it comes to feminist spaces and conversations both online and off, too often straight, white women are the focus, leaving tons of women out.


The solution? Intersectionality.

What the heck is "intersectionality"?

Intersectionality (or intersectionalism) is the study of intersections between forms or systems of oppression, domination or discrimination. ... This feminist sociological theory was first named by Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989, though the concept can be traced back to the 19th century. The theory suggests that — and seeks to examine how — various biological, social and cultural categories such as gender, race, class, ability, sexual orientation, religion, caste, species and other axes of identity interact on multiple and often simultaneous levels, contributing to systemic injustice and social inequality.
Wikipedia

Simply put, intersectionality looks at how different aspects of people influence their experiences with oppression and inequality. Check it out — I even made a handy Venn diagram to show how things like race, gender, sexuality, and physical ability overlap!



For example, when we're talking about women's issues, it's important to remember that the experiences of a straight, able-bodied white woman are going to be very different than the experiences of a gay, disabled black woman. Both women need feminism, but they also face different challenges and inequalities based on who they are.

Now that you have the basics, let's take this intersectionality crash course a bit further...

What if you used fast food to explain intersectionality in feminism?

Akilah Hughes' "Intersectional feminism and pizza" is the ultimate explanation for the importance of intersectionality, and she manages to tackle it with pizza. But before jumping into the video, here's a handy key to help you understand her delicious brilliance.


*WOC = women of color
*LBT = lesbian, bisexual, transgender

Alright, now that you're up to speed on how this analogy works, take a look at the video!


True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Sir David Attenborough has one of the most recognized and beloved voices in the world. The British broadcaster and nature historian has spent most of his 94 years on Earth educating humanity about the wonders of the natural world, inspiring multiple generations to care about the planet we all call home.

And now, Attenborough has made a new name for himself. Not only has he joined the cool kids on Instagram, he's broken the record for reaching a million followers in the shortest period. It only took four hours and 44 minutes, which is less time than it took Jennifer Aniston, who held the title before him at 5 hours and 16 minutes.

A day later, Attenborough is sitting at a whopping 3.4 million followers. And he only has two Instagram posts so far, both of them videos. But just watch his first one and you'll see why he's attracted so many fans.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

Keep Reading Show less

One night in 2018, Sheila and Steve Albers took their two youngest sons out to dinner. Their 17-year-old son, John, was in a crabby mood—not an uncommon occurrence for the teen who struggled with mental health issues—so he stayed home.

A half hour later, Sheila's started getting text messages that John wasn't safe. He had posted messages with suicidal ideations on social media and his friends had called the police to check on him. The Albers immediately raced home.

When they got there, they were met with a surreal scene. Their minivan was in the neighbor's yard across the street. John had been shot in the driver's seat six times by a police officer who had arrived to check on him. The officer had fired two shots as the teen slowly backed the van out of the garage, then 11 more after the van spun around backward. But all the officers told the Albers was that John had "passed" and had been shot. They wouldn't find out until the next day who had shot and killed him.

Keep Reading Show less