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I was prepared for the same old boring acceptance speech, but then she went there.

It's pretty incredible that "Transparent," a TV show about a trans woman coming out while raising a family, won the 2015 Golden Globe for Best TV Series Comedy. But the acceptance speech from Executive Producer/Director Jill Soloway confirms why this win was so very important for not only the trans community, but the world.

I was prepared for the same old boring acceptance speech, but then she went there.

I want to thank the trans community. They are our family. They make this possible. This award is dedicated to the memory of Leelah Alcorn and too many trans people who die too young. And it's dedicated to you, my trans parent, my moppa. You're watching at home right now. I just wanna thank you for coming out, because in doing so you made a break for freedom. You told your truth. You taught me how to tell my truth and make this show. And maybe we're gonna teach the world something about authenticity, truth, and love. To love!
— Jill Soloway


So why exactly is this such a big deal?


In December 2014, 17-year-old trans teen Leelah Alcorn committed suicide, leaving behind a heartbreaking suicide note on her Tumblr citing depression and continuing struggles with her parents over her gender identity. This sparked an important conversation about the struggles of LGBTQ youth, especially those who are trans.

There are still so many people who don't understand what it means to be trans and therefore have a difficult time understanding and accepting their friends, family, and coworkers when they come out. It's so important to continue telling trans stories to not only encourage others to value and embrace their gender identity, but also to educate others and promote love and acceptance.

In Soloway's speech, she refers to her "Moppa," which is a combination of the words "mama" and "poppa." This is an important detail because Soloway has said in interviews that she wrote "Transparent" as a response to her own experience with her Moppa's transition. So while "Transparent" is technically a work of fiction, it comes from a place of honesty and experience, which is really beautiful.

Full disclosure: I haven't seen "Transparent" — yet — but considering all the good things I've heard about it, along with Jill Soloway's incredibly touching speech, I clearly need to get on the bandwagon. Check out the season one trailer below.



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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.