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How does McDonald's deal with store owners accused of racism? Not like you'd hope.

If these allegations are true ... ugh. As if McDonald's wasn't disappointing enough.

A group of McDonald's employees are suing the company after being fired from their jobs.

The workers allegedly were told by the franchisee who owns the Virginia-based restaurant that, despite their being good workers, they "did not fit the profile" he was looking for.


"Profile?" Listen, buddy, your "restaurant" is a McDonald's.


As it happens, all of the fired workers are black.

They say the firings were racially motivated, citing multiple incidents of racially-charged insults (watch the video below for specifics) and the absence of any documented wrongdoing on their part as employees. Not only are they suing the franchisee, Soweva Co., but they also believe McDonald's national corporation should be held responsible. Time's Victor Luckerson writes:

"[The] lawsuit argues that McDonald's franchises are 'predominately controlled' by their corporate parent, as McDonald's sets national policies for restaurant operations, corporate representatives oversee franchises and the national company coordinates training for all managerial employees. "

In a statement regarding the lawsuit, McDonald's Corp. craftily avoids accountability with lots of fluffy corporate language about diversity but not a single word as to how they intend to address the matter:

"McDonald's has a long-standing history of embracing the diversity of employees, independent franchisees, customers and suppliers, and discrimination is completely inconsistent with our values. McDonald's and our independent owner-operators share a commitment to the well-being and fair treatment of all people who work in McDonald's restaurants."

There is no workplace in the United States where the mistreatment of workers based on race is acceptable.

And there's no amount of money — let alone the minimum wages these workers earned — that makes it OK.

We have yet to see what the court decides in this case, but if you want McDonald's to take affirmative action to ensure workplace equality, send them a letter and share this story with someone you think should know about it.

Watch the video:

Courtesy of CeraVe
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