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How does McDonald's deal with store owners accused of racism? Not like you'd hope.

If these allegations are true ... ugh. As if McDonald's wasn't disappointing enough.

How does McDonald's deal with store owners accused of racism? Not like you'd hope.

A group of McDonald's employees are suing the company after being fired from their jobs.

The workers allegedly were told by the franchisee who owns the Virginia-based restaurant that, despite their being good workers, they "did not fit the profile" he was looking for.


"Profile?" Listen, buddy, your "restaurant" is a McDonald's.


As it happens, all of the fired workers are black.

They say the firings were racially motivated, citing multiple incidents of racially-charged insults (watch the video below for specifics) and the absence of any documented wrongdoing on their part as employees. Not only are they suing the franchisee, Soweva Co., but they also believe McDonald's national corporation should be held responsible. Time's Victor Luckerson writes:

"[The] lawsuit argues that McDonald's franchises are 'predominately controlled' by their corporate parent, as McDonald's sets national policies for restaurant operations, corporate representatives oversee franchises and the national company coordinates training for all managerial employees. "

In a statement regarding the lawsuit, McDonald's Corp. craftily avoids accountability with lots of fluffy corporate language about diversity but not a single word as to how they intend to address the matter:

"McDonald's has a long-standing history of embracing the diversity of employees, independent franchisees, customers and suppliers, and discrimination is completely inconsistent with our values. McDonald's and our independent owner-operators share a commitment to the well-being and fair treatment of all people who work in McDonald's restaurants."

There is no workplace in the United States where the mistreatment of workers based on race is acceptable.

And there's no amount of money — let alone the minimum wages these workers earned — that makes it OK.

We have yet to see what the court decides in this case, but if you want McDonald's to take affirmative action to ensure workplace equality, send them a letter and share this story with someone you think should know about it.

Watch the video:

via KrustyKhajiit / YouTube

Thomas F. Wilson played one of the most recognizable villains in film history, Biff Tannen, in the "Back to the Future" series. So, understandably, he gets recognized wherever he goes for the iconic role.

The attention must be nice, but it has to get exhausting answering the same questions day in and day out about the films. So Wilson created a card that he carries with him to hand out to people that answers all the questions he gets asked on a daily basis.

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Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
True

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected diverse communities due largely in part to social factors such as inadequate access to housing, income, dietary options, education and employment — all of which have been shown to affect people's physical health.

Recognizing that inequity, Harlem-based chef JJ Johnson sought out to help his community maximize its health during the pandemic — one grain at a time.

Johnson manages FIELDTRIP, a health-focused restaurant that strives to bring people together through the celebration of rice, a grain found in cuisines of countless cultures.

"It was very important for me to show the world that places like Harlem want access to more health-conscious foods," Johnson said. "The people who live in Harlem should have the option to eat fresh, locally farmed and delicious food that other communities have access to."

Lack of education and access to those healthy food options is a primary driver of why 31% of adults in Harlem are struggling with obesity — the highest rate of any neighborhood in New York City and 7% higher than the average adult obesity rate across the five boroughs.

Obesity increases risk for heart disease or diabetes, which in turn leaves Harlem's residents — who are 76% Black or LatinX — at heightened risk for complications with COVID-19.

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I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

Melanie Cholish/Facebook

While this poster is great to bring attention to the issue of child trafficking, it is a "shocking" picture of a young girl tied up. It has that dark gritty feeling. I picture her in a basement tied to a dripping pipe.

While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

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via WatchMojo / YouTube

There are two conflicting viewpoints when it comes to addressing culture from that past that contains offensive elements that would never be acceptable today.

Some believe that old films, TV shows, music or books with out-of-date, offensive elements should be hidden from public view. While others think they should be used as valuable tools that help us learn from the past.

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