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Hobby Lobby Gets What It Wants And John Oliver Explains Why That's Going To Backfire Badly

The Supreme Court ruled that Hobby Lobby (a company whose 401(k) plan includes investments in the companies that produce the very drugs it sued in order to not cover) is free to discriminate against women and not cover some forms of birth control. There are things that are still protected like the birth control pill, which — aside from being used for sex — is also used to treat endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome, eases cramps, smooths skin, helps with anemia, helps protect women from pelvic inflammatory disease, and reduces the risks of some cancers. Then there are the things the Supreme Court allowed private companies to choose not to cover, things like IUDs and the morning-after pill, which Hobby Lobby claims cause abortions (even though they really actually don't do that). It's so arbitrary though, I'm not sure how it will stick.John Oliver has an opinion about that. Especially at 3:40.

Hobby Lobby Gets What It Wants And John Oliver Explains Why That's Going To Backfire Badly

If any of you think this is a step in the right direction, ask yourself if companies should be able to choose whether your blood transfusions should be covered or whether you should have to eat the cost of a horrific, debilitating accident (some religions don't believe in medical intervention). What about if your company's religion doesn't approve HIV medications because they have a misguided idea that only gay people get it (as if sexual orientation is in any way relevant to people having the right to receive medicine) and you as a straight person had one night of an indiscretion from a partner who didn't disclose? What if your business' religious beliefs include only eating vegetarian and you suffer a heart attack from eating too many burgers and they won't cover it?

The court has opened a precedent so wide that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg stated in her dissent: "In a decision of startling breadth, the Court holds that commercial enterprises, including corporations, along with partnerships and sole proprietorships, can opt out of any law (saving only tax laws) they judge incompatible with their sincerely held religious beliefs. The Court's determination that RFRA extends to for-profit corporations is bound to have untoward effects. Although the Court attempts to cabin its language to closely held corporations, its logic extends to corporations of any size, public or private."


This has far-reaching and awful repercussions that go far beyond the faith of an owner of one company. This is going to backfire in their faces horribly. Especially, if you help get out the word about how awful it truly is. You can also Like John Oliver on Facebook if you want to see more like this.

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The best way to honor Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is to share her legacy with the next generation. The feminist icon may have passed away last week at the age of 87, but she lives on in the hearts and minds of multiple generations of Americans, especially women.

In the 1970s, the young Ginsburg "convinced the entire nation, through [her arguments at the] Supreme Court, to... adopt the view of gender equality where equal means the same -- not special accommodations for either gender," Abbe Gluck, a Yale Law School professor and former clerk of Justice Ginsburg, told ABC News.

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Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

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Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

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