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Here's a 2-minute movie about a gay scooter gang that'll rev up your heart.

This is no ordinary biker club. Technically, they're not one at all — they ride scooters!

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When I think of motor bike clubs, something more like "Sons of Anarchy" comes to mind.

But here's a club you probably haven't heard of.

They burn rubber on scooters (not choppers), but they're still total bad-asses ... in their own right.



Meet SQREAM.

The club started with a group of people who, as scooter-loving gays, gravitated toward each other at biker rallies around the country. Then in 2004, they decided to make a whole thing of it, and SQREAM was born!


SQREAM = Scooter Queers Riding Everywhere And More

Keep in mind that the LGBT rights movement has come a long way since SQREAM took their first ride. In the early 90s, their founders faced an outright denial of their constitutional rights by a state ballot initiative.

Under the law, a gay person couldn't even get a library card! Thankfully, the law was overturned (multiple times) by people who actually know the constitution.

Members of SQREAM know their work is not done.

So they've been riding year-after-year for over a decade for something we all want: EQUALITY.

"I think we all fight every single day to see the positive changes because there's a lot of people that have gone before us not having these rights."

It doesn't take much to see how just their cause really is.

Here's the key: See them as human beings. Easy, right? It's even in their charter:


Sound familiar?

And given the progress that's been made over just the last decade, I'd say every mile has been worth it.

via Jeremy Hogan / YouTube

Vauhxx Booker, a civil rights activist from Bloomington, Indiana, claims that a group of white men threatened to lynch him during an altercation on July 4 near Lake Monroe, but he was saved by onlookers who intervened.

Video taken during the incident shows he was held down by a group of men who pinned him to a tree in a wooded area. Booker says that while he was being held down, the men threatened to break his arms, repeatedly said "get a noose," and told his friends to leave the area.

The men later let him go after being confronted by onlookers who gathered at the scene.

The incident began, according to Booker, when he and his friends were making their way to the lake to see the lunar eclipse when a white man on an ATV told them they were trespassing. When Booker and his friends continued to walk to the lake, the man on the ATV and his friends allegedly shouted "white power" at them, which is when things turned violent.

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