More

Here are just 3 of the *smaller* lies SeaWorld makes its employees tell its guests.

I remember vacationing at SeaWorld as a kid, but after hearing about all the ways SeaWorld lies to its staff and to its guests while knowingly putting both people and whales in danger every single day ... I'm never going back again, unless I've got a picket sign and a protest group with me.

Here are just 3 of the *smaller* lies SeaWorld makes its employees tell its guests.

Lie #1: Orcas live longer at SeaWorld.


The Truth: Orcas live longer in the wild.

In fact, the oldest recorded orca whale is over 103 years old.

Lie #2: Dorsal fin collapse isn't uncommon in the wild.

The Truth: Actually, it's pretty rare.

Lie #3: The Orcas are with their family at SeaWorld

The Truth: SeaWorld has redefined what "family" means.

Seriously, y'all, the part of the documentary where you see the mother orca crying for days
because they took her calf away to one of the other parks made me cry like a baby.

Just three of the smaller lies SeaWorld instructs its employees to tell guests about the whales:

You'll hear about the really big lies when you watch the whole documentary, and they truly will scoop your heart out and feed it to you in the worst/best way possible.

Watch the trailer:

Probably one of the most damning facts from the whole documentary is mentioned at 2:09.

If you're still skeptical after everything you've seen here, let me point you toward this Wikipedia page about killer whale attacks on humans in the wild versus captivity as well as this fact sheet "Blackfish" released in response to SeaWorld's attempt to discredit the documentary, and this explanation for how SeaWorld twists the existing data to support its own narrative. And let me remind you that most of the people interviewed in the documentary are former SeaWorld employees and trainers recounting their own experiences — not, as some people have scoffed at me, "animal activists just looking for a scandal."

Veteran Chicago radio personality "Ramblin' Ray" Stevens was driving in his car two weeks ago when he passed Braxton Mayes, 20, several times.

"I was on my way home from work Friday and saw a young man walking down Kirk Road," Stevens later recalled. "I dropped my friend off at the studio I work out of and headed home. This young man was still walking. So I drove around the block and asked him if he needed a ride."

"In our town, we help people out," Stevens said.

Keep Reading Show less