He walked 20 miles to his first day of work. Here's what happened when his boss found out.

Walter Carr was all set for his first day of a new job, but then his car broke down 20 miles from work.  

With the car dead and his new job with a moving company called Bellhops on the line, Carr knew he only had one choice: to walk. So after taking a four-hour nap to give him strength, the Birmingham, Alabama, resident started the long walk to work at midnight.

It took him another four hours to get to his destination.


At 3 a.m., several officers saw Carr walking through a neighborhood and stopped to ask where we was going.

After Carr told them about his journey, the officers took him to breakfast and then to a church, where they thought he'd have a safe place to rest until his job started.

But not wanting to be late for the first moving job of the day, Carr took off for Jenny and Chris Lamey's home. Another officer — who'd just come on the clock and heard Carr's story — picked him up and drove him the rest of the way.

By 6:30 a.m., the Lameys got a knock at their door. Carr had made it to work and was ready to move their household. Carr put in a full day, refusing even a short nap before he started.

Jenny Lamey, so impressed with Carr's perseverance, shared the story on Facebook. The post has since gone viral, amassing hundreds of shares.

Somehow my original post was deleted. Here is it again!! I am overwhelmed that it was shared over 800 times in one day!...

Posted by Jenny Hayden Lamey on Sunday, July 15, 2018

The CEO of Bellhops caught wind of Carr's journey.

Luke Marklin, the CEO of Bellhops, drove from Tennessee to meet the guy who'd walked 20 miles to get to work. By the end of their meeting, Carr was walking away with something more than just a clap on the shoulder.

Marklin gifted Carr his own car to make sure that he wouldn't have to choose walking over sleeping before work again. Jenny Lamey also contributed, starting a GoFundMe that's raised more than $8,000 for Carr's future.

"I want people to know this: No matter what the challenge is, you can break through the challenge," Carr told AL.com. "Nothing is impossible unless you make it impossible. You can do anything you set your mind to."

Watch Carr get his new car below:

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via Fox 5 / YouTube

Back in February, northern Virginia was experiencing freezing temperatures, so FOX 5 DC's Bob Barnard took to the streets to get the low down. His report opens with him having fun with some Leesburg locals and trying his hand at scraping ice off their parked cars.

But at about the 1:50 mark, he was interrupted by an unaccompanied puppy running down the street towards the news crew.

The dog had a collar but there was no owner in sight.

Barnard stopped everything he was doing to pick the dog up off the freezing road to keep it safe. "Forget the people we talked to earlier, I want to get to know this dog," he told his fellow reporters back in the warm newsroom.

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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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