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He spent 5 hours shooting the supermoon eclipse. When he finally posted, the Internet went wild.

Stunning composite photograph of supermoon eclipse garners massive social sharing.

Dallas-based photographer Mike Mezeul II has captured a lot of phenomenal images in the sky in his career.

He's photographed the stars...


All images by Mike Mezeul II, used with permission.

...and some more stars. (He's trying to collect them all.)


He's spotted tornadoes...

...and supercell thunderstorms.

He's even captured the fabled double rainbow!

So naturally, his gear was at the ready for the recent lunar double-whammy — the 33-year return of the supermoon total lunar eclipse.

In an interview with Upworthy, Mezeul (who's also a friend of mine) explained that he was actually a little anxious as he tracked the night sky for those five hours:

"I was honestly very hesitant that the image would even happen. I was really worried that the clouds would obscure the moon right when I needed to shoot it. I was also really worried that people would be over the lunar eclipse shots and that I was wasting my time trying to share this moment."

Time wasted? No way, said the Internet.

Mezeul's photograph took just a little longer to share because he was creating a composite image that shows all of the eclipse phases at once.

Within hours of posting it to Facebook, hundreds of thousands of people had liked the photo, and at the time I'm writing this, it's been shared well over half a million times.

Take a look and you'll see why:

"This is my third lunar eclipse to shoot and it was by far my favorite. It was an earlier transition and I was able to incorporate a beautiful city skyline into the shot. Also, being able to shoot from the roof of a hotel and chow down on room service was a bonus." — Mike Mezeul II

Mezeul's photo was worth the wait. But what's perhaps more phenomenal than the sight itself is seeing so many people from across world excited about it.

As Upworthy's Lori White wrote, "We're all hemisphere neighbors, billions of us, standing underneath the same skyroof, seeing our nearest celestial neighbor change color."

Think about that any time you're at a loss of hope for humanity. Humans too often struggle to agree on matters of this world. But events like the supermoon eclipse remind us that we are capable of finding common ground.

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