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Having An Open Mind That Maybe You're Not Right All The Time? Good. Doing What This Host Did? Bad.

Cis host Piers Morgan ("cis" or "cisgender" refers to someone who identifies as the gender/sex they were assigned at birth) had trans activist and author Janet Mock on his show twice.

Having An Open Mind That Maybe You're Not Right All The Time? Good. Doing What This Host Did? Bad.

The first time, he focused a little too much on the more salacious facts of her life and referred to her as a boy, which she never in her life has identified as. Big no-no. The second time, instead of listening to his guest's concerns (isn't listening to your guest a host's job?), Morgan accused her and her fans of vilifying him. Mock replied to that, and it's just fantastic.

("I was born a baby who was assigned male at birth. I did not identify or live my life as a boy. As soon as I had enough agency in my life to grow up, I became who I am.")


("And this did not start at 18, when I went to Thailand to have surgery. It started when I was 6 years old and my parents saw me for who I was and allowed me to live my life. That's a lot of nuance and it's hard to communicate that in 30 seconds or even in a 140 character tweet.")

("That's why I'm here right now. I want this to be a learning and teaching moment for all of us. Just as much as you were vilified, as you say, from my supporters.")

("That's actually my community, who are vilified every single day. And misunderstood. And driven to isolation. And told that who they are is incorrect and wrong and should be under investigation.")

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Photo courtesy of Capital One
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