Have siblings? Raising siblings? These hilarious comics are spot-on.

Having siblings can be one of the most enraging, frustrating, and contentious parts of your life — but they can also be one of the most rich, rewarding, and joyous relationships in your life too.

This is what artist and author Adrienne Hedger of Hedge Humor set out to show in her comics. As the mother of siblings, she’s experienced her fair share of their zany behavior. From the never-ending battle over a single chair to boasting about being the favorite child, these are moments that ring true to siblings all over the world.

Whether you have a sibling, are the parent of siblings, or even just know siblings, these comics will feel familiar in some way to everyone:


1. The battle over the best seat in the house.

All comics by Adrienne Hedger, used with permission.

2. Arguments that don't have to make sense to be won.

3. Keeping secrets from your siblings is practically impossible.

4. Being older and wiser is just an excuse to be mischievous.

5. Getting creative with your arguments so you don't cross the line in front of your parents.

6. When the next generation is already plotting against you.

7. The timeless majesty of the illogical.

8. That feeling when you've seen that argument before.

9.  Just sitting next to them can bring about a heated debate.

10. Making up games to play together never gets old — even if the name of said game is a bit of a red herring.

Whether or not we have siblings, we can all appreciate the humor in these situations.

As Maya Angelou famously said, "I don't believe an accident of birth makes people sisters or brothers. It makes them siblings, gives them mutuality of parentage. Sisterhood and brotherhood is a condition people have to work at."

This work is the backbone behind the humor in Hedger's comics. Despite all the ribbing and nagging and poking and prodding and teasing and joking and hitting with pillows, these are moments of bonding and connection that shape the people we grow into as adults. So take time today to appreciate the siblings in your life!

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