Do you know how many Fortune 500 companies are run by women?
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If you spend much time with young kids, you're sure to encounter one question: "Can you tell me a story?"

For all except the most gifted storytellers among us, it can cause a moment of anxiety. "What story do I tell?" you ask yourself. You want to fill little heads with wholesome and encouraging ideas — damsels in distress and damagingly masculine heroes are all out of the question. But on the other hand, spinning a completely original tale on the spot is a pretty tall order.

This is one story that you might be able to tell kids is true just a few years from now:


This is what life could look like for women in 2025.

Posted by Upworthy on Wednesday, April 26, 2017

It's wonderful to imagine a world run by both women and men. But as of right now, it's still a fantasy.

In the first part of 2017, there were only 27 female CEOs leading Fortune 500 companies. What's worse? That's a record high. Women hold only 12% of board seats worldwide, and only 4% of boards around the world are chaired by women — which makes it even harder to set policies that allow women to rise to leadership positions.

Photo via iStock.

It's time for us — all of us — to end the gender inequality that dictates corporate culture.

It's in everyone's best interest to have more women at the executive level. Companies with female leaders tend to have policies that grant more generous family leave and make progress toward narrowing the gender pay gap. Research also suggests that female-led businesses are better at creating inclusive workplace cultures, meaning that gender diversity helps increase other types of diversity, too.

Oh, and also? Financially, companies with female leaders knock it out of the park.

Photo via iStock.

The Rockefeller Foundation's goal of 100 (or more!) women CEOs of Fortune 500 companies by 2025 means charting the path of progress toward a fairer, better world of work.

"100x25" may be ambitious, but it could — and should — become reality. With more women at the helm, we'll also see increased opportunities for people of all identities at every level. When the work world is fairer, it will be possible for everyone to write their own story.

So when that happens and you hear, "Can you tell me a story?" you'll know just which one to tell: ours.

History books are filled with photos of people we know primarily from their life stories or own writings. To picture them in real life, we must rely on sparse or grainy black-and-white photos and our own imaginations.

Now, thanks to some tech geeks with a dream, we can get a bit closer to seeing what iconic historical figures looked like in real life.

Most of us know Frederick Douglass as the famous abolitionist—a formerly enslaved Black American who wrote extensively about his experiences—but we may not know that he was also the most photographed American in the 19th century. In fact, we have more portraits of Frederick Douglass than we do of Abraham Lincoln.

This plethora of photos was on purpose. Douglass felt that photographs—as opposed to caricatures that were so often drawn of Black people—captured "the essential humanity of its subjects" and might help change how white people saw Black people.

In other words, he used photos to humanize himself and other Black people in white people's eyes.

Imagine what he'd think of the animating technology utilized on myheritage.com that allows us to see what he might have looked like in motion. La Marr Jurelle Bruce, a Black Studies professor at the University of Maryland, shared videos he created using photos of Douglass and the My Heritage Deep Nostalgia technology on Twitter.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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You know that feeling you get when you walk into a classroom and see someone else's stuff on your desk?

OK, sure, there are no assigned seats, but you've been sitting at the same desk since the first day and everyone knows it.

So why does the guy who sits next to you put his phone, his book, his charger, his lunch, and his laptop in the space that's rightfully yours? It's annoying!

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via Saturday Night Live / YouTube

Through 46 seasons, "Saturday Night Live" has had its ups and downs. There were the golden years of '75 to '80 and, of course, the early '90s when everyone in the cast seemed to eventually become a superstar.

Then there were the disastrous '81 and '85 seasons where the show completely lost its identity and was on the brink of cancellation.

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