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Cop doesn't understand how law works, arrests guy who does for something totally legal.

That awkward moment when your average citizen knows more about the law than the police do.

Cop doesn't understand how law works, arrests guy who does for something totally legal.

Andrew Kalleen, 30, a street musician, was playing in the subway station, which is totally legal (as long as you aren't in the way — he was against the wall). A police officer disagreed.

Andrew had been stopped by police on six previous occasions, had gotten two previous tickets, and decided he'd had enough. Andrew told him the number of the law. The police officer then read the law that protected Andrew out loud. And didn't understand that the law was on Andrew's side.


So the officer, with the help of his fellow officers and to the great annoyance of everyone in the station, arrested Andrew. According to Andrew's account in Rolling Stone, when the officer realized he didn't have anything to arrest him on upon getting in his vehicle,

"my officer was frantically looking through his phone to try to find some law to charge me with..."

By the end of the video, everyone was booing and speaking out on the performer's behalf.

Watch the whole thing here:

The law the officer cited was as follows (emphasis mine):

Section 1050.6c of the NYC transit authority rules state: "Except as expressly permitted in this subdivision, no person shall engage in any nontransit uses upon any facility or conveyance. Nontransit uses are noncommercial activities that are not directly related to the use of a facility or conveyance for transportation. The following nontransit uses are permitted by the Authority, provided they do not impede transit activities and they are conducted in accordance with these rules: public speaking; campaigning; leafletting or distribution of written noncommercial materials; activities intended to encourage and facilitate voter registration; artistic performances, including the acceptance of donations."

In a interview with the New York Daily News, Andrew doesn't really blame the officer.

"I do sympathize with [the officer]," Kalleen said. "He's sort of a cog in a larger problem that's encouraging that behavior."

If the police don't know the rules, how can we expect them to enforce them properly? Educate officers in the law and teach them to de-escalate (along with body cameras, more oversight, etc...) . It's a win for all.

In the interim, Andrew is still waiting to find out the status of his arrest.

True

Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Grahame / Flickr, @imeyrick / TikTok

The UK is experiencing record-breaking weather this week. England reached its hottest temperature of the year on Tuesday when it hit 32.2°C at Heathrow Airport in west London. Temperatures in Northern Ireland reached an all-time high when 31.3°C was recorded at Castlederg the next day.

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