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Sandra Bullock — actress extraordinaire, Academy Award winner, and mom — shared some heartwarming news in today's issue of People.

Image by Gage Skidmore/Flickr.


Her little family of two (she and adorable 5-year-old son Louis) ...

Little Louis, lookin' good, but possibly not too amused with the photographer interrupting his snack time. Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

... has grown to three!


Bullock recently adopted 3½-year-old foster daughter Laila. Yep! Louis, who Bullock adopted in 2010, is getting a younger sister.

And Bullock? She's over the moon about becoming a mom again:

"When I look at Laila, there's no doubt in my mind that she was supposed to be here," Bullock told People in an exclusive interview. "I can tell you absolutely, the exact right children came to me at the exact right time."

Bullock didn't want to publicly share that she was a foster parent until now because she was worried it could jeopardize the adoption.

But now that it's been finalized ... and now that she is talking about it, it's the perfect time for some real talk about foster care.

As of 2013, there are over 400,000 children in the United States who are in the foster care system.

Of those, 108,000 are currently waiting to be adopted. Many children experience multiple placements — as many as eight or more.

They need parents.

And as the PSAs encouraging people to consider becoming foster parents say, you don't have to be perfect to be a perfect parent.

Want to help? You can! (And you don't have to actually become a foster parent to make a difference.)

If you're interested in learning more about becoming a foster parent, you can visit AdoptUsKids.org to find out how to get started.

If you'd like to help in other ways, check out My Stuff Bags, an organization that helps foster kids by ensuring they have actual pieces of luggage or duffel bags (instead of garbage bags) to transport their belongings between foster homes.

Want to volunteer? Visit CASA for Children — a network of volunteers that offers advocates and legal help to foster kids.

Congratulations to Sandra Bullock on becoming a mother of two!

Here's to more happy endings for foster kids everywhere.

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