Can a child's doll get her period? Thanks to some new accessories, yep. She sure can!

What's better than an average doll? One that gets her period, of course!

Wait, what?

Yep, that's right. Now your kiddo's doll can pretend to have her period, thanks to a new line of products called "Period Party."


Nickolay Lamm, creator of the Lammily doll — the one that's kinda like Barbie but has proportions similar to the average 19-year-old American woman — took things a step further: normalizing periods. (They're already normal, of course, but we don't always act like it.)

Why yes, this is a doll lying in a lovely field of doll-sized menstrual products. All images courtesy of Nickolay Lamm.

Called the "Period Party," this kit allows the Lammily doll to (pretend to) have her period.

It includes a pair of underwear:

A sticker sheet of pads and liners:

And a calendar with sticker dots to track cycles:

Cool idea, right?

The Period Party is all about helping everyone feel more comfortable talking about — and experiencing — a totally normal part of life.

I asked Nickolay Lamm what he had in mind when he created it. “Menstruation is still taboo in our society, and some even use it as an insult," he explained. That's certainly true — I've heard plenty of guys asking each other if they "need a tampon" or whether they "started their period" to imply they're not “manly" enough.

Even more importantly, let's talk about the girls who are, you know, actually starting their periods. “I just don't think that something as core to a woman's life and health as menstruation should be seen as embarrassing in any way, shape, or form,“ Nickolay said. “If it weren't for menstruation, I wouldn't even be alive right now! So why not celebrate it, why not make it as accepted as any other bodily function?"

Can I get an amen?!

Nickolay was inspired by these awesome ads by HelloFlo (they're super funny if you haven't heard of them). After seeing them, he thought it would be pretty cool if the Lammily doll could have her period. So he got to work, collaborating with his mom, who helped design everything.

The result is this great kit that comes with a fun sheet of facts, written in relatable language for preteen girls.

Normalizing something that's actually normal but that we don't always treat as normal? I'm totally here for that!

You can purchase the Period Party here.

Check out this great video. It's funny and cute!

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