Bumbling dad commercials are cringeworthy. So the U.K.'s doing something about them.

Thanks to new advertising rules, you won't be seeing the clueless dad tropes on British TV.

You know the type. Mom's on a trip/taking a rest day/somehow escaped from the Stepford wives and left Dad (gasp!) to take care of the chores. He bumbles around the house, burning dinner, and acting as if the laundry machine were impossible alien technology.

So let me get this straight, you put this "clo-thing" in the "ham-per?" Photo from iStock.


Well, there'll be no more of that nonsense. New regulations proposed by the U.K.'s Advertising Standards Agency will nix dated gender stereotypes in television commercials. Advertisers will face tougher guidelines around images of diaper-phobic dads or glorified-maid moms.

The agency won't ban all stereotypes — they point out it'd be "inappropriate and unrealistic" to try to wipe out traditionally gendered imagery — but they do want to change some of the cringeworthy gendered stereotypes we're used to seeing in ads.

Basically, if a mop company wants to have a dad in their commercial, he's going to have to act as if he's actually seen a mop before.

These new rules came after a review following a controversial 2015 "beach body" advertisement and, if adopted, would go into effect next year, as the BBC reports.

A single ad, image, or story isn't itself a problem, but it can get overwhelming when every single paper towel, mop, or diaper company seems to fall back on the same old tropes.

Research hints that these kinds of stereotypes can actually affect people in real life. The agency hopes that guiding advertisers away from them might in turn have real world benefits.

The United Kingdom notably has stronger limitations on what can appear on TV compared with the United States.

But the best reason to wave goodbye to those old ads might be that they just don't match the real world anymore.

Men who change diapers or take their kids to the park aren't chipping in or babysitting. They're being dads. And the idea that Mom is destined to be the sole housekeeper is something better left in the 1950s — and on '50s television.

This article originally appeared on 01.09.18


Why should a superintendent get a raise while teachers in the same district struggling to make ends meet see their paychecks flatline — year after year after year?

Teacher Deyshia Hargrave begged the question. Minutes later, she was handcuffed and placed in the backseat of a cop car.

The scene was captured below by YouTube user Chris Rosa, who attended a board meeting for Vermilion Parish Schools in Louisiana.

You can watch Hargrave begin speaking about 33 seconds in. The situation starts becoming contentious around 6:35 minutes. Hargrave is arrested at 8:35, and then walked outside in handcuffs and placed in the back of police vehicle. (Story continues below.)



"We work very hard with very little to maintain the salaries that we have," Hargrave, who teaches middle school language arts, said during a public comment portion of the meeting, stating that she's seen classroom sizes balloon during her time at the school with no increased compensation. "We're meeting those goals, while someone in that position of leadership [the superintendent] is getting raise? It's a sad, sad day to be a teacher in Vermilion Parish."

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