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Australians Reveal Themselves To Be A Class Act, Even In The Face Of Tragedy. #illridewithyou

It's not every day that Twitter gives me faith in humanity. Today is that day.

Australians Reveal Themselves To Be A Class Act, Even In The Face Of Tragedy. #illridewithyou

Sometimes, you feel like hiding who you are.

As the news of the Dec. 15, 2014, hostage situation in Sydney was breaking, along with the possibility that the suspect was a Muslim extremist, a woman saw another woman on the train remove her head scarf.


These women had nothing to do with the hostage situation, but anti-Muslim sentiment can be so strong that any time something like this happens, it can be dangerous to wear a hijab in public for fear of harassment.

This story was retweeted and suddenly became the fastest-growing hashtag on Twitter.

People started posting details about their commutes and inviting any Muslims who felt unsafe traveling in the area to get in touch.

There's safety in numbers.


People expressed solidarity for their Muslim neighbors, racking up a thousand tweets per minute with the #illridewithyou hashtag.

In the midst of a crisis, it gave people hope.


It also moved them from clicktivism to activism.

Sometimes, when a tragedy strikes, you don't know what to say. #illridewithyou gave Aussies a response. They could stand up for people who might be scared to go out on their own.


It made a difference to at least some Muslims in the community.

I hope Australians are proud of themselves for responding to terrible events in a productive and compassionate way.

It's not a new idea. I loved this post with an image from the 1940s, another era of religiously motivated division.


Make sure your neighbors know #illridewithyou.

Here's a video with more information on the events:


Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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'Merry Christmas' on YouTube.

The world must have been—mostly—good this year. Because Elton John and Ed Sheeran have teamed up to gift us all with a brand new Christmas single.

The song, aptly named “Merry Christmas,” is a perfect blend of silly and sweet that’s cheery, bright and just a touch bizarre.

Created with the holiday spirit in every way, it has whimsical snowball fights, snow angels (basically all the snow things), festive sweaters, iconic throwbacks and twinkling lights galore. Plus all profits from the tune are dedicated to two charities: the Ed Sheeran Suffolk Music Foundation and the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

I personally don’t know which is more of a highlight: Ed Sheeran channeling his inner-Mariah, performing a faux sexy dance in a leg revealing Santa outfit, or him flying through the air with a giant Frosty the Snowman … who seems to be sporting glasses similar to Elton’s. Are we meant to believe that Elton is the Snowman? This music video even has mystery.
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