On Tuesday night, singer Ariana Grande shared a powerful message about sexism and objectification with her 43 million Twitter followers.

The "Side to Side" singer and badass feminist frequently uses Twitter to talk about things that are happening in her personal life, but on Tuesday night, she shared a message that should resonate with us all about treating each other as human beings and not objects.

‌Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.


The story — following an encounter she and her boyfriend, Mac Miller, had with a fan — is something far too relatable for many young women. She wrote:

"Went to pick up food with my boyfriend tonight and a young boy followed us to the car to tell Mac that he's a big fan. He was loud and excited and by the time M was seated in the driver's seat he was literally almost in the car with us. I thought all of this was cute and exciting until he said, 'Ariana is sexy as hell man I see you, I see you hitting that!!!!'

*Pause*

Hitting that? The fuck??"



Photo by Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images.

"This may not seem like a big deal to some of you, but I felt sick and objectified. I was also sitting right there when he said it. (?) I've felt really quiet and hurt since that moment. Things like that happen all the time and are the kinds of moments that contribute to women's sense of fear and inadequacy. I am not a piece of meat that a man gets to utilize for his pleasure. I'm an adult human being in a relationship with a man who treats me with love and respect."

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Clear Channel.

"It hurts my heart that so many young people are so comfortable enough using these phrases and objectifying women with such ease. I felt like speaking out about this one experience tonight because I know very well that most women know the sensation of being spoken about in an uncomfortable way publicly or taken advantage of publicly by a man. We need to talk about these moments openly because they are harmful and they live on inside of us as shame. We need to share and be vocal when something makes us feel uncomfortable because if we don't, it will just continue. We are not objects or prizes. We are QUEENS."

Some fans were quick to note that Grande often uses sexually-charged imagery in her music videos. She had a pretty great response to that too.

It's easy to write Grande off as just a pop star, but it's worth noting just how far her influence reaches.

With more than 43 million followers on Twitter, the 23-year-old has a larger social entourage than Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Michelle Obamacombined. It matters that she's out here spreading important messages about respect and consent to people in the world. And not only sharing her personal story, but encouraging all of us to partake in the conversation and take a meaningful stand on objectification.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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Alberto's legs can't even reach the pedals, but that doesn't stop his little hands from flying expertly over the keys as incredible music pours out of the piano at the 10th International Musical Competition "Città di Penne" in Italy. Even if you've seen young musicians play impressively, it's hard not to have your jaw drop at this one. Sometimes a kid comes along who just clearly has a gift.

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How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

One day I described the process of listening to the radio, waiting for my favorite song to come on so I could record it on my tape recorder, and how mad I would get when the deejay talked through the intro of the song until the lyrics started. My Spotify-spoiled kids didn't even understand half of the words I said.

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