When the Rana Plaza factory collapsed in 2013, it thrust Bangladesh into the world news for the worst reason possible. For many of us, the country might be little more than that event and a word we see on clothing tags. But there's a whole other side to the country that is wonderful and hopeful and full of smart young girls.

It's pretty easy to underestimate just how huge the impact of educating girls can be, especially in the developing world.

Not only does it mean more cash money for these women during their lifetimes...


...as well as improved sexual health and lower risk of maternal death...

...it also means fewer deaths and better health for their future children.

Now you're probably all like: OK, sounds good, I'm on board. But what does this have to do with fashion?

Well, some very intrepid Bangladeshi American ladies (both named Nur-E), have founded a line of gorgeous handmade jewelry that benefits one of the first girls schools in Bogra, Bangladesh, a country where educating girls can have an especially huge impact. They're deeply connected to this school and have found a new and creative way of helping.

There are lots of different kinds of charity, but as far as teaching a man (or Bangladeshi girl) to fish, this one takes the cake.

I'm very grateful to these ladies for showing us a more hopeful picture of Bangladesh and connecting it to something much, much larger: the education of girls and women.

via Lady A / Twitter and Whittlz / Flickr

In one of the most glaringly hypocritical moves in recent history, the band formerly known as Lady Antebellum is suing black blues singer Anita "Lady A" White, to use her stage name she's performed under for over three decades.

Lady Antebellum announced it had changed its name to Lady A on June 11 as part of its commitment to "examining our individual and collective impact and marking the necessary changes to practice antiracism."

Antebellum refers to an era in the American south before the civil war when black people were held as slaves.

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