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When the Rana Plaza factory collapsed in 2013, it thrust Bangladesh into the world news for the worst reason possible. For many of us, the country might be little more than that event and a word we see on clothing tags. But there's a whole other side to the country that is wonderful and hopeful and full of smart young girls.

It's pretty easy to underestimate just how huge the impact of educating girls can be, especially in the developing world.

Not only does it mean more cash money for these women during their lifetimes...


...as well as improved sexual health and lower risk of maternal death...

...it also means fewer deaths and better health for their future children.

Now you're probably all like: OK, sounds good, I'm on board. Butwhat does this have to do with fashion?

Well, some very intrepid Bangladeshi American ladies (both named Nur-E), have founded a line of gorgeous handmade jewelry that benefits one of the first girls schools in Bogra, Bangladesh, a country where educating girls can have an especially huge impact. They're deeply connected to this school and have found a new and creative way of helping.

There are lots of different kinds of charity, but as far as teaching a man (or Bangladeshi girl) to fish, this one takes the cake.

I'm very grateful to these ladies for showing us a more hopeful picture of Bangladesh and connecting it to something much, much larger: the education of girls and women.

via Pexels

Three people engaged in conversation at a party.

There are some people who live under the illusion that everything they say is deeply interesting and have no problem wasting your time by rambling on and on without a sign of stopping. They’re the relative, neighbor or co-worker who can’t take a hint that the conversation is over.

Of all these people, the co-worker who can’t stop talking may be the most challenging because you see them every day in a professional setting that requires politeness.

There are many reasons that some people talk excessively. Therapist F. Diane Barth writes in Psychology Today that some people talk excessively because they don’t have the ability to process complex auditory signals, so they ramble on without recognizing the subtle cues others are sending.

It may also be a case of someone who thinks they’re the most interesting person in the conversation.

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Democracy

Patagonia says it will pay bail for employees arrested in abortion rights protests

A powerful statement from one of our nation's most trusted brands.

Everyone loves someone who had an abortion and other prote… | Flickr

In today's economy, people who work are demanding more accountability from their employers: better wages, benefits, transparency and alignment on values. The emphasis on shared values is coming to the forefront in the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, which removes federal protections for abortion. States, local governments and individuals are scrambling to react to the decision, which tosses out 50 years of legal precedence.

While the nation sorts out the politics and future legal decisions surrounding reproductive health, some companies are getting ahead of the issue by coming out publicly to support abortion rights, commonly referred to as "reproductive justice" by activists and advocates of a woman's right to choose. One of the most outspoken companies is Patagonia, who announced in the wake of the Supreme Court decision that they will not only financially support individuals who choose to have an abortion but they will provide funds to pay the bail for individuals who face legal expenses while protesting for reproductive justice.

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One of these things is not like the other.

Sometimes, life can unexpectedly snatch you away from safety and thrust you into imminent danger. Other times, life can just as quickly turn a dire circumstance into a heartwarming miracle.

Such was the case for a baby hawk who went from being dinner to being adopted by a family of bald eagles near the city of Nanaimo in British Columbia, Canada. The amazing moment was captured by a 24-hour livestream webcam run by GROWLS, a nonprofit organization that helps rescue and rehabilitate injured wildlife.

The video shows the seemingly doomed baby hawk being tossed into an eaglet’s nest. Pam McCartney, a GROWLS volunteer who had been watching the livestream at the time, braced herself.

"Usually when I watch, like, David Attenborough and his shows, I can close my eyes or fast forward or whatever, but this was live at the time, and I was just like, oh, my gosh, oh, my gosh," she told CBC.

Much to her surprise, nature seemed to have something else in mind.

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