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Andy Grammer's 'mom hug' with a stranger is a beautiful reminder that we're all connected.

Many people chimed in to share similar stories of cosmic connections with strangers and stories of spreading kindness and love in honor of loved ones who have passed.

Singer Andy Grammer had a special connection with his mom who died of cancer nine years ago.

Grammer's beloved mother, Kathy, passed away from breast cancer in 2009, when Grammer was 25. He has written several songs dedicated to her, and he shares the wisdom he gleaned from his mama in his hit single "Give Love." Her death was an unexpected blow, and Grammer has talked openly about the difficult journey of coming to terms with her passing.

Years after her death, Grammer and his mom still share a special connection — one that made itself known while he was eating breakfast at a restaurant in Hampton Beach, New Hampshire.


Grammer picked up the tab for some women who reminded him of his mom. But he didn't expect their response.

Was sitting at breakfast in Hampton Beach and across the restaurant were five SUPER CUTE elderly ladies. I don’t know...

Posted by Andy Grammer on Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Grammer wrote in a Facebook post that he saw "five SUPER CUTE elderly ladies" across the restaurant. "I don't know why but it made me miss my mom hard and I felt a strong urge to pick up their check. I don’t know them and didn’t want to bother them but I just did it."

"Then I was just gonna leave," he wrote, "cause a lot of times it’s better to just do nice deeds without asking for acknowledgment but something felt like I should tell them I missed my mom, like they might like to hear that. So I walked over and said 'you are five of the sweetest ladies I’ve ever seen, I lost my mom awhile back and something about seeing you made me miss her this morning so I’m getting your check.'"

As it turns out, one of the women had lost her son. And now we're all crying together.

"The lady on the end popped up with arms wide open and said 'COME HERE, I lost my son and really needed this.' And then she gave a mom hug I needed and I gave her a son hug she needed," Grammer wrote. Then he summarized the whole mysterious/cosmic/providential experience with a simple truth: "We are all so connected."

One of the moms, Mary Conant, commented on his Facebook post and said that the women "send our sincere appreciation to your for treating us to breakfast today at the Sea Ketch at Hampton Beach, New Hampshire. Sending you lots of hugs. Your mom sent you to us today."

The post received hundreds more comments, many from people sharing similar stories of cosmic connections with strangers and stories of spreading kindness and love in honor of loved ones who have passed.

What a beautiful reminder that we're all connected in ways we aren't even aware of.

Today is 9 years since my sweet mother left this world. I brought my little Louisiana K Grammer to her grave site this...

Posted by Andy Grammer on Wednesday, January 3, 2018

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