+
Most Shared

An artist created itty-bitty paintings every day for a year. Here are 15 of them.

Teeny tiny things are totally fascinating.

Which is why Brooke Rothshank took an interest in miniatures 11 years ago after attending a doll house miniature show. Shortly after, she began creating highly detailed, fascinating itty bitty (totally not a technical term) paintings in oils and acrylics. She even received a scholarship to attend the International Guild of Miniature Artisans school.

As many couples do, Rothshank and her husband started a family and a few years ago, with a 2-year-old and a 5-year-old, she was having trouble completing any tiny drawings.


"I enjoy being with my kids and I love being a mom but making art is an integral part of living well for me," Rothshank told Upworthy.

And so with the support and help of her husband, her mom, and baby-sitters, she decided to make herself a promise.

Brooke Rothshank committed to creating one tiny painting every day for an entire year.

She was successful in her year-long endeavor and got back into the routine of making time for her passion. In fact, it went so well that she's going to commit to a weekly commissioned piece of work for the entire year in 2017.

The paintings are gorgeous and immaculate and tiny! Each one can take anywhere from half an hour to four hours to complete. The paintings are at 1/12th scale and super detailed.

So here are 15 of her amazing tiny paintings!

1. A perfect miniature unicorn.

All photos of paintings belong to Brooke Rothshank and are shared here with permission.

2. The ultimate single serving Sriracha.

3. An itty-bitty kitty cat.

4. A tiny violin.

5. A super small fish bowl.

6. A teeny baby elephant.

7. A pocket-sized goat.

8. A minuscule gummy bear.

9. A teeny turtle.

10. The smallest cheese spread ever.

11. A sweet sleeping fox.

12. A minuscule sprinkled donut.

13. A pint-sized boot.

14. Slight strawberries.

15. A teensy treat.

The paintings are fantastic, but equally important is the message Rothshank shared along with them.

"I have a personal need to create," she said. But as most parents know, it's not always easy to balance parenting young children with work and hobbies. And often, our personal interests are the first things we set aside. "[F]inding smaller ways to satisfy that need has been my solution," she said.

How does that work? For Rothshank, who gave birth to her third child seven weeks early in December, it means asking for help from family and using baby-sitters to ensure she has even small windows of time for her art.

"My advice is to make your passions a consistent priority," she said. "When you are parenting small children, devoting time to yourself each day simply for self-care can make a radical difference."

This story first appeared on the author's Medium and is reprinted here with permission.

Because you're a girl.

This article originally appeared on 04.14.17


I was promoted a few weeks ago, which was great. I got a lot of nice notes from friends, family, customers, partners, and random strangers, which was exciting.

But it wasn't long until a note came in saying, “Everyone knows you got the position because you're a girl." In spite of having a great week at a great company with great people whom I love, that still stung, because it's not the first time I've heard it.

Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

This blind chef wore a body cam to show how she prepares dazzling dishes.

How do blind people cook? This "Masterchef" winner leans into her senses.

Image pulled from YouTube video.

Christine Ha competes on "Masterchef."

This article originally appeared on 05.26.17


There is one question chef Christine Ha fields more than any other.

But it's got nothing to do with being a "Masterchef" champion, New York Times bestselling author, and acclaimed TV host and cooking instructor.

The question: "How do you cook while blind?"

Keep ReadingShow less
All illustrations are provided by Soosh and used with permission.

I have plenty of space.

This article originally appeared on 04.09.16


It's hard to truly describe the amazing bond between dads and their daughters.

Being a dad is an amazing job no matter the gender of the tiny humans we're raising. But there's something unique about the bond between fathers and daughters.

Most dads know what it's like to struggle with braiding hair, but we also know that bonding time provides immense value to our daughters. In fact, studies have shown that women with actively involved fathers are more confident and more successful in school and business.

Keep ReadingShow less

Gordon Ramsay at play... work.

This article originally appeared on 04.22.15


Gordon Ramsay is not exactly known for being nice.

Or patient.

Or nurturing.

On his competition show "Hell's Kitchen," he belittles cooks who can't keep up. If people come to him with their problems, he berates them. If someone is struggling to get something right in the kitchen, he curses them out.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 01.27.20


From 1940 to 1945, an estimated 1.3 million people were deported to Auschwitz, the largest complex of Nazi concentration camps. More than four out of five of those people—at least 1.1 million people—were murdered there.

On January 27, 1945, Soviet forces liberated the final prisoners from these camps—7,000 people, most of whom were sick or dying. Those of us with a decent public education are familiar with at least a few names of Nazi extermination facilities—Auschwitz, Dachau, Bergen-Belsen—but these are merely a few of the thousands (yes, thousands) of concentration camps, sub camps, and ghettos spread across Europe where Jews and other targets of Hitler's regime were persecuted, tortured, and killed by the millions.

Keep ReadingShow less
Health

What I realized about feminism after my male friend was disgusted by tampons at a party.

"After all these years, my friend has probably forgotten, but I never have."

Photo by Josefin on Unsplash

It’s okay men. You don’t have to be afraid.

This article originally appeared on 08.12.16


Years ago, a friend went to a party, and something bothered him enough to rant to me about it later.

And it bothered me that he was so incensed about it, but I couldn't put my finger on why. It seemed so petty for him to be upset, and even more so for me to be annoyed with him.

Recently, something reminded me of that scenario, and it made more sense. I'll explain.

Keep ReadingShow less