11-year-old Isaac wrote a rap about being bullied. Too embarrassed to perform it, he sent it to his favorite rapper for help.

Mac Lethal, a Kansas City rapper best known for his super-fast delivery and the best breakfast anthem of all time, put Isaac's rap over a beat and made a video of the powerful letter.

Image via Mac Lethal/YouTube.


Isaac's story of bullying is heartbreaking and familiar.

Isaac and another kid named Thomas used to be great friends — riding bikes, swimming, and playing video games together. Now, Thomas won't stop physically and verbally tormenting him.

All GIFs via Mac Lethal/YouTube.

Isaac keeps trying to reconnect with his old friend, and he even let Thomas copy his math work. But he took advantage of Isaac's kindness.

Isaac has no idea what went wrong or how it happened. And it really hurts.

But despite their falling out, Isaac still has hopes he can salvage the friendship, and he wants Thomas to know he cares.

Losing a trusted friend is hard enough. That same friend turning into a bully without an explanation? It's absolutely devastating and painful.

That pain comes through in Isaac's gut-wrenching lyrics in the full video below:

Dealing with bullies is something too many kids deal with every day, but there's a lot we can do.

Sadly, there are bullying situations like Isaac's in many classrooms and schools around the country. 28% of students in grades 6-12 have experienced bullying. More than 70% of kids say they've seen it in their schools.

Bullying prevention and intervention are complicated, but approaches that involve the entire school community show promise. When everyone — including students, families, teachers, and staff like bus drivers, cafeteria monitors, and school nurses — encourages a culture of respect and models kindness, it can go along way. Students also benefit when teachers, parents, and other trusted adults talk to them about bullying and ensure they know how to find help for themselves or other kids who need it.

Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images.

Bullying is not "just a part of growing up," and it's not OK. Kids need to know they're not alone.

Whether you're a well-known rapper, parent, educator, coach, or just a concerned adult, connect with local schools and community partners that work with kids and families to create a culture of kindness. When we stand together, we can improve our schools and communities.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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