An 11-year-old wrote a rap about being bullied. His favorite rapper brought it to life.

11-year-old Isaac wrote a rap about being bullied. Too embarrassed to perform it, he sent it to his favorite rapper for help.

Mac Lethal, a Kansas City rapper best known for his super-fast delivery and the best breakfast anthem of all time, put Isaac's rap over a beat and made a video of the powerful letter.

Image via Mac Lethal/YouTube.


Isaac's story of bullying is heartbreaking and familiar.

Isaac and another kid named Thomas used to be great friends — riding bikes, swimming, and playing video games together. Now, Thomas won't stop physically and verbally tormenting him.

All GIFs via Mac Lethal/YouTube.

Isaac keeps trying to reconnect with his old friend, and he even let Thomas copy his math work. But he took advantage of Isaac's kindness.

Isaac has no idea what went wrong or how it happened. And it really hurts.

But despite their falling out, Isaac still has hopes he can salvage the friendship, and he wants Thomas to know he cares.

Losing a trusted friend is hard enough. That same friend turning into a bully without an explanation? It's absolutely devastating and painful.

That pain comes through in Isaac's gut-wrenching lyrics in the full video below:

Dealing with bullies is something too many kids deal with every day, but there's a lot we can do.

Sadly, there are bullying situations like Isaac's in many classrooms and schools around the country. 28% of students in grades 6-12 have experienced bullying. More than 70% of kids say they've seen it in their schools.

Bullying prevention and intervention are complicated, but approaches that involve the entire school community show promise. When everyone — including students, families, teachers, and staff like bus drivers, cafeteria monitors, and school nurses — encourages a culture of respect and models kindness, it can go along way. Students also benefit when teachers, parents, and other trusted adults talk to them about bullying and ensure they know how to find help for themselves or other kids who need it.

Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images.

Bullying is not "just a part of growing up," and it's not OK. Kids need to know they're not alone.

Whether you're a well-known rapper, parent, educator, coach, or just a concerned adult, connect with local schools and community partners that work with kids and families to create a culture of kindness. When we stand together, we can improve our schools and communities.

This article originally appeared on 01.09.18


Why should a superintendent get a raise while teachers in the same district struggling to make ends meet see their paychecks flatline — year after year after year?

Teacher Deyshia Hargrave begged the question. Minutes later, she was handcuffed and placed in the backseat of a cop car.

The scene was captured below by YouTube user Chris Rosa, who attended a board meeting for Vermilion Parish Schools in Louisiana.

You can watch Hargrave begin speaking about 33 seconds in. The situation starts becoming contentious around 6:35 minutes. Hargrave is arrested at 8:35, and then walked outside in handcuffs and placed in the back of police vehicle. (Story continues below.)



"We work very hard with very little to maintain the salaries that we have," Hargrave, who teaches middle school language arts, said during a public comment portion of the meeting, stating that she's seen classroom sizes balloon during her time at the school with no increased compensation. "We're meeting those goals, while someone in that position of leadership [the superintendent] is getting raise? It's a sad, sad day to be a teacher in Vermilion Parish."

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