After being shamed, she exposed the double standard all breastfeeding mothers face.
via Facebook

There’s a sexist double standard in America that goes something like this: It’s acceptable for breasts to be shown on television, the Internet, in movies, and on newsstands. But if you dare pull a breast out in public to breastfeed a baby—the one activity that breasts were made for—you will probably be shamed.

No one understands this double standard more than Wittney Hope.

Hope was shopping at the Dillard’s in Chattanooga, Tennessee, when her baby began signaling that it was time to nurse. To be polite, Hope asked an employee if it was ok for her child to “eat here.”


The employee signaled that it was fine, so Hope lifted her shirt and began to discreetly breastfeed her child. The employee then told her she could not “do that” in the store and told Hope to go to the bathroom.

“I was completely shocked as I have never had anyone comment on me breastfeeding in the whole 18 months I have been nursing,” Hope wrote on Facebook.

As Hope exited the store, she walked by a massive advertisement for bras and she couldn’t believe the irony. Evidently, at Dillard’s, model boobs are ok for the world to see, but mom boobs are for the bathroom.

via Facebook

Here’s Hope’s full post that she wrote on Dillard’s Facebook page:

This afternoon while shopping in your store, (Hamilton Place- Chattanooga) my daughter got really fussy. I searched for a quiet secluded area to nurse my child. When I found a place I asked if it was okay for her to eat here. The employee at customer service nodded. I then began to nurse my child. I didn't use a cover up (I did that in the pic to prove the irony) I discreetly pulled my shirt down and her head covered me up. The same lady then told me I could not ‘do that’ here. She told me I would need to go to the restroom. I was completely shocked as I have never had anyone comment on me breastfeeding in the whole 18 months I have been nursing. Yet alone, another woman, possibly a mother herself. I repeated her to make sure I understood. Annoyed, she began to tell me the directions to the restroom again.. (Down the hall, take the elevator, then around the corner) I'm sure my hungry child would understand that we have to take a journey to somewhere more secluded where she can eat.. NOT. I immediately went and asked for the manager so I could file a formal complaint (which I did online) As we were leaving the store I passed by this advertisement for bras. I mean seriously the lady’s face is not even in this. Why is it acceptable for a giant picture of BOOBS to be on the wall but I can not feed my

Sincerely,

Pissed off Mommy who will never be shopping at Dillards
Courtesy of FIELDTRIP
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