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Judy Mitchell and Robyn Moreland are the kind of couple that should never have problems becoming parents.

Marriage has been a major roadblock for same-sex couples looking to adopt in the U.S., and the recent Supreme Court ruling on marriage isn't the be-all and end-all solution to their problems. This family is no exception.

Both women knew they wanted to have kids, and they found someone to share that with in each other.

Judy and Robyn met at a school they both taught at and have been together for roughly 13 years. When Judy failed to get pregnant via in-vitro fertilization, they looked to adoption to build their family.


Pictured: cuties. All GIFs and images via Ziniu Chen/Vimeo.

They now have seven adorable children. Most of them are young enough that they don't have memories of their lives before being adopted, but the couple's oldest children do.

Chase and Saydai were adopted when they were 10 and 8 years old, respectively. The brother-sister pair had been in foster care since they were 5 and 3, after someone discovered them behind a warehouse by themselves. They had been wandering the streets for a week in the July heat with no shoes, no food, and no water.

Judy and Robyn have an infinite amount of unconditional love for their children.

Don't just take my word for it, take Chase's:

He dreams of dodging his younger brother's wicked fastball.

Plus, being out of the foster care system will make it much easier for Chase and his siblings find jobs and pursue higher education in the future:

"I personally have friends who are still in group homes right now, and I know it is a lot more difficult for them to get a job or to get the financial aid to go to college," says Chase. "When I moved in with Judy and Robyn, there's more likelihood that I will be able to access those resources that are available to me."

Even though Chase, Saydai, and their adopted siblings were able to get out of the foster care system, their family faced legal challenges in the process.

One of the biggest challenges of all?

Robyn is the only legal guardian of all seven children, meaning Judy's rights as a parent are few to none.

What would happen if Robyn, who ended up applying as the guardian, became seriously ill? What if something happened to one of the kids and Judy was barred from coming to their aid because she isn't their legal guardian?

Robyn describes the extra precautions they had to take to protect their children:

"We had to go and get wills, have everything set out legally so that if something were to happen to me, the kids would be able to stay with Judy because otherwise the state would take them."

This summer's marriage equality ruling was historic. But gay couples are still fighting for their right to adopt.

Some recent (and pretty eye-opening) challenges include:

Yet, over 400,000 children were in the U.S. foster care system as recently as 2013.

Judy and Robyn's kids found their family, and their family should be recognized as such.

Watch them tell their story here:

As face masks have become mandatory in many places to limit the spread of coronavirus, it's also become an increasingly politicized thing. As we know, anything that involves political polarization also involves vast amounts of misinformation and disinformation. Whose idea was the internet again?

No one I know loves wearing a mask. We all wish we didn't have to. But there are an awful lot of people saying they can't wear one, or they refuse to wear one because they've been led to believe that masks are somehow more dangerous than not wearing one. I've seen and read "information" on everything from masks depriving people of oxygen to masks causing CO2 build up to masks creating fungus problems.

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