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A voice as angelic as Sam Smith's is rare, but his wedding happening in this place is even rarer.

Grammy hopeful and openly gay singer Sam Smith released a video days before the Grammy Awards, and it's a reaffirmation of everything that makes his success and popularity so poignant. I don't want to say anything else about it — you'll know why in four minutes and nine seconds.

A voice as angelic as Sam Smith's is rare, but his wedding happening in this place is even rarer.
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Mr. Smith released a statement about why he made the video:

LAY ME DOWN - http://po.st/7I39eB
A photo posted by Sam Smith (@samsmithworld) on


If you're aware of the current state of LGBT issues, you know that gay rights have made such long strides in the past few years. In fact, as of the beginning of 2015, 36 states have legalized gay marriage. But that doesn't mean we're all equal now.


Even when all 50 states recognize gay marriage, there will still be some people whose religion will dictate how they feel. This is especially tough for LGBT people who belong to a religion. Most Christian churches — except for Presbyterian and Episcopalian churches, for the most part — ban gay marriage.

Even though gay marriage is legal in his home country, England, Mr. Smith decided to pose an interesting question: Does religious law have to be followed to the letter? And if it is, are you eating pork, charging interest on loans, and letting women combine fabrics?

Maybe the issue isn't so black and white.


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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


via Paul Friedman / Twitter

The best way to honor Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is to share her legacy with the next generation. The feminist icon may have passed away last week at the age of 87, but she lives on in the hearts and minds of multiple generations of Americans, especially women.

In the 1970s, the young Ginsburg "convinced the entire nation, through [her arguments at the] Supreme Court, to... adopt the view of gender equality where equal means the same -- not special accommodations for either gender," Abbe Gluck, a Yale Law School professor and former clerk of Justice Ginsburg, told ABC News.

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


The legality of abortion is one of the most polarized debates in America—but it doesn’t have to be.

People have big feelings about abortion, which is understandable. On one hand, you have people who feel that abortion is a fundamental women’s rights issue, that our bodily autonomy is not something you can legislate, and that those who oppose abortion rights are trying to control women through oppressive legislation. On the other, you have folks who believe that a fetus is a human individual first and foremost, that no one has the right to terminate a human life, and that those who support abortion rights are heartless murderers.

Then there are those of us in the messy middle. Those who believe that life begins at conception, that abortion isn’t something we’d choose—and we’d hope others wouldn’t choose—under most circumstances, yet who choose to vote to keep abortion legal.

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I got married and started working in my early 20s, and for more than two decades I always had employer-provided health insurance. When the Affordable Care Act (ACA, aka "Obamacare")was passed, I didn't give it a whole lot of thought. I was glad it helped others, but I just assumed my husband or I would always be employed and wouldn't need it.

Then, last summer, we found ourselves in an unexpected scenario. I was working as a freelance writer with regular contract work and my husband left his job to manage our short-term rentals and do part-time contracting work. We both had incomes, but for the first time, no employer-provided insurance. His previous employer offered COBRA coverage, of course, but it was crazy expensive. It made far more sense to go straight to the ACA Marketplace, since that's what we'd have done once COBRA ran out anyway.

The process of getting our ACA healthcare plan set up was a nightmare, but I'm so very thankful for it.

Let me start by saying I live in a state that is friendly to the ACA and that adopted and implemented the Medicaid expansion. I am also a college-educated and a native English speaker with plenty of adult paperwork experience. But the process of getting set up on my state's marketplace was the most confusing, frustrating experience I've ever had signing up for anything, ever.

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