A viral tweet meant to discredit Beto O'Rourke has everyone, even conservatives, taking his side.

Let's talk about Ted Cruz. The guy's a problem. And not just for Texas.

The senator's only been warming his chair for five years, but that hasn't stopped him in excelling at confusing, confounding, and outright outraging both his constituents and (this is pretty big, Ted!) the rest of America.

Here's just a brief rundown of some of the things Cruz has done since he was elected to office:


Cruz is currently fighting for his senate seat against democrat Beto O'Rourke and his latest move is pretty confusing. It appears that he's asking his constituents to vote for his opponent.

Of course, that doesn't seem like the wrong thing to do considering all the information up top, but when you're running a political campaign it feels like you should be making the strongest case for yourself. Especially when protestors have already rented billboard trucks to remind your constituents that the current president of the United States (who's quite unpopular himself) has renounced you several times in the past.

But after their first debate against each other — during which Cruz dodged questions about police violence — he posted a video of O'Rourke speaking to a packed audience about the very topic that he refused to discuss.

Captioned "In Beto O'Rourke's own words," the video shows the democratic hopeful denouncing the death of Botham Jean, a Dallas resident who was shot to death by an off-duty police officer who entered his apartment by mistake.

The video was supposed to be a takedown, but it's got voters galvanized.

"How can it be in this day and age in this very year in this community that a young man, African American, in his own apartment, is shot and killed by a police officer?" O'Rourke asks the audience.  

"And when we all want justice and the facts and the information to make an informed decision what is released to the public? That he had a small amount of marijuana in his kitchen? How can that be just in this country? How can we continue to lose the lives of unarmed black men in America at the hands of white police officers?"

"That is not justice. That is not us. That can and must change," O'Rourke cries as his listeners erupt in agreement. "Are you with me on this?"

The response to Cruz's tweet suggests that they are.

The reason that Cruz posted this video is likely much more sinister. But we have time to change where we're headed.

While it's fun to consider that Cruz may just be losing steam, the reality is much more stark. According to experts, including Daniel W. Drezner at The Washington Post, Cruz's choice to post this video is likely less about O'Rourke's message and more about proving that Cruz's opponent is anti-police, a dangerous sentiment in Texas.

"The only possible reason I can see for showing O’Rourke’s perfectly sane words without comment is because it has nothing to do with his words and everything to do with the visual," Drezner writes.

"O’Rourke delivers this speech at an African American church, and the churchgoers react in an extremely energetic manner. That is the image that Ted Cruz wants his supporters to see, because he thinks it is the image that will mobilize his supporters into disliking O’Rourke and voting against him."

Though no one can say exactly what's going on in Cruz's mind, one thing is clear: His rhetoric and views aren't just disagreeable, they're dangerous for a great number of people. And that's exactly why it's on all of us to make sure that we immerse ourselves in politics and vote in the upcoming elections. And hey, if Cruz has convinced you to vote for his opponent, this is one time I'll say more power to him.

True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Sir David Attenborough has one of the most recognized and beloved voices in the world. The British broadcaster and nature historian has spent most of his 94 years on Earth educating humanity about the wonders of the natural world, inspiring multiple generations to care about the planet we all call home.

And now, Attenborough has made a new name for himself. Not only has he joined the cool kids on Instagram, he's broken the record for reaching a million followers in the shortest period. It only took four hours and 44 minutes, which is less time than it took Jennifer Aniston, who held the title before him at 5 hours and 16 minutes.

A day later, Attenborough is sitting at a whopping 3.4 million followers. And he only has two Instagram posts so far, both of them videos. But just watch his first one and you'll see why he's attracted so many fans.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


via State of Deleware

Same-sex marriage is legal in America and these days 63% of all Americans support the idea. Ten years ago, it was still a controversial issue among Democrats, but in 2019, 79% say they support same-sex marriage.

The issue played a big role in the Democratic primary for the Delaware's House of Representatives 27th district race. On September 15, Eric Morrison defeated incumbent Earl Jacques in a landslide and gay rights was a central issue.

In 2013, Jaques voted against same-sex marriage and refused to vote yes or no on banning gay conversion therapy in the state. On the other hand, Morrison is a gay drag queen who performs under the name Anita Mann and is very progressive on LGBTQ issues.

Keep Reading Show less

One night in 2018, Sheila and Steve Albers took their two youngest sons out to dinner. Their 17-year-old son, John, was in a crabby mood—not an uncommon occurrence for the teen who struggled with mental health issues—so he stayed home.

A half hour later, Sheila's started getting text messages that John wasn't safe. He had posted messages with suicidal ideations on social media and his friends had called the police to check on him. The Albers immediately raced home.

When they got there, they were met with a surreal scene. Their minivan was in the neighbor's yard across the street. John had been shot in the driver's seat six times by a police officer who had arrived to check on him. The officer had fired two shots as the teen slowly backed the van out of the garage, then 11 more after the van spun around backward. But all the officers told the Albers was that John had "passed" and had been shot. They wouldn't find out until the next day who had shot and killed him.

Keep Reading Show less