+
More

A senator's victim-blaming comments sparked a tutu-powered protest in Wyoming.

People across Wyoming are living up to its 'Equality State' nickname.

"I know a guy who wears a tutu and goes to bars on Friday night and is always surprised that he gets in fights. Well, he kind of asks for it," said Senator Mike Enzi.

"That's the way that he winds up with that kind of problem," the four-term Wyoming senator continued, responding to a question from a local student about his views on LGBTQ rights on April 20.

As one might expect, Sen. Enzi's statements secured him some major blowback from LGBTQ individuals, allies, and just about anyone who thinks that what outfit you wear determines whether or not you "ask for" assault.


Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Across Wyoming, people responded in the best way possible.

They donned tutus of their own and headed out to their local bars in a powerful statement of solidarity.

Yes, there is a man from Wyoming who wears tutus and dresses in his daily life. His name is Sissy Goodwin (pictured in the tweet above), a former rodeo cowboy and aircraft mechanic and probably the man Sen. Enzi was referring to. And, yes, Goodwin has been physically assaulted because he likes to wear dresses and tutus.

Wearing dresses and tutus is just part of who Goodwin is. He's not harming anybody, and he's certainly not "asking for" assault.

In droves, people turned out at Wyoming bars wearing tutus.

You gotta admit — it's pretty cool to see people come to his defense (and that of anyone else who eschews gender norms) in person and on social media in response to Enzi's remarks.

Wyoming may be known for things like cowboys and rugged masculinity — but it's also known as the Equality State, and this protest shows why.

"When LGBTQ Wyomingites are faced with discrimination, harassment and violence, we’re 'not asking for it,'" Wyoming Equality wrote on its website. "All Wyomingites deserve respect and dignity and to feel safe in our state — no matter what they’re wearing at a bar."

Because being bi isn't a phase. ❤ #LiveAndLetTutu #NormalizeTutus

A post shared by sara elizabeth ☀️ (@twigott) on

Lander's operation tutu! Love this town!!! #operationtutu #liveandlettutu #normalizetutu

A post shared by Liz Hardwick (@lizard_wick) on

Enzi has apologized for his statement, but when it comes to protecting LGBTQ rights, his voting record tells a pretty clear story.

As they say, actions speak louder than words.

As senator, Enzi has voted time and again against pro-LGBTQ measures (including votes against the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act — Shepard, who was tortured and murdered for being gay in 1998, was from Wyoming — and against the Violence Against Women Act reauthorization). Additionally, he's introduced legislation that would make it legal to discriminate against gay and lesbian couples seeking to adopt children.

For the past two sessions of Congress, Enzi has received a score of 0 from the Human Rights Campaign, and in 2014, he was named to the group's "Hall of Shame."

The fact that people in reportedly the most conservative state in the country are ready to take a stand in the name of equality and LGBTQ rights is a major reason to smile.

Red states, blue states, and everywhere in between — there are good people doing good things across the nation and across the political spectrum.

If there's a silver lining to Enzi's clumsy and unfortunate remarks, it's that it gave the rest of the country a chance to see just how great the people of Wyoming can be.

#wyomingasfuck #liveandlettutu

A post shared by Robert Kirkwood (@mr_kirkwood) on

Celebrity

U.S. Soccer star expertly handles an Iranian reporter’s loaded questions about race.

Tyler Adams’s response proves exactly why he’s the captain of the US soccer team.

Tyler Adams expertly handles Iranian reporter's question

Reporters are supposed to ask the right questions to get to the truth but sometimes it seems sports reporters ask questions to throw you off your game. There's no doubt that this Iranian reporter who was questioning Tyler Adams, the US soccer team captain at the press conference during the World Cup had an agenda that didn't involve getting to the truth.

It's not clear if the questions were designed to throw the young player off of his game or if the goal was embarrassment. It really is hard to tell, but Adams handled the unexpectedly harsh encounter with intelligence and poise when some may have found it justified for him to get angry.

Keep ReadingShow less

Phil Collins and George Harrison

This article originally appeared on 12.01.21


Beatle George Harrison was pigeon-holed as the "Quiet Beatle," but the youngest member of the Fab Four had an acerbic, dry sense of humor that was as sharp as the rest of his bandmates.

He gave great performances in the musical comedy classics, "A Hard Days Night" and "Help!" while holding his own during The Beatles' notoriously anarchic press conferences. After he left the band in 1970, in addition to his musical career, he would produce the 1979 Monty Python classic, "The Life of Brian."

Keep ReadingShow less
Photo by Jeremy Wong on Unsplash

Teen raises $186,000 to help Walmart worker retire.

In America, many people have to work well past the age of retirement to make ends meet. While some of these people choose to work past retirement age because it keeps them active, some older people, like Nola Carpenter, 81, work out of necessity.

Carpenter has been working at Walmart for 20 years, way beyond most people's retirement age just so that she can afford to continue to pay her mortgage. When 19-year-old Devan Bonagura saw the woman looking tired in the break room of the store, he posted a video to his TikTok of Carpenter with a text overlay that said, "Life shouldn't b this hard..." complete with a sad face emoji.

In the video, Carpenter is sitting at a small table looking down and appearing to be exhausted. The caption of the video reads ":/ I feel bad." Turns out, a lot of other people did too, and encouraged the teen to start a GoFundMe, which has since completed.

Keep ReadingShow less
popular

10 ways kids appear to be acting naughty but actually aren't.

Many of kids' so-called 'bad' behaviors are actually normal developmental acts of growing up.

This article originally appeared on 07.19.17


When we recognize kids' unwelcome behaviors as reactions to environmental conditions, developmental phases, or our own actions, we can respond proactively, and with compassion.

Here are 10 ways kids may seem like they're acting "naughty" but really aren't. And what parents can do to help.

Keep ReadingShow less