Comedian Jim Jefferies put it best when he said, “If you don’t drink then all of your stories suck and end with, ‘and then i got home…’”

A hungover Scotsman is going viral for telling a story about how he didn’t make it home after a night of drinking and it’s hilarious.

A video shared on the Blantyre Telegraph’s Facebook page shows an unidentified Scottish man in hysterics, smoking a cigarette while eating a cup of instant noodles, and recounting what happened after he woke up in the wrong house.


According to his story, the man was at a party and attempted to get in a taxi, but the vehicle took off without him. So he went back to the house party, grabbed a blanket, curled up and went to sleep.

The problem was that he went into the wrong house.

“A couple woke me up going ‘who are you?’ I’m like: ‘what are you talking about? I was here at the party last night.’ And he went: ‘Trust me man there was no party here last night’”

The couple also discovered the man had attempted to make a cup of instant noodles, but failed before passing out. “'I must have been making myself noodles,” the man hazily recounted.

“Thank god this woman is from Glasgow,” the man said. “She was like: ‘Aye we’re welcoming.’ Got a cup of tea and a fag!” (In the U.K., the word “fag” means cigarette.)

Obviously, getting so wasted that you break into a stranger's house, cook a meal, and then pass out on their couch means you should reevaluate your life.

But it’s cool to see there’s some people in this world who are cool enough not to call the cops on you for having a hard night out.

It is safe to say that the wise words of Muhammad Ali stands the test of time. Widely considered to be the greatest heavyweight boxer the world has ever seen, the legacy of Ali extends far beyond his pugilistic endeavors. Throughout his career, he spoke out about racial issues and injustices. The brash Mohammed Ali (or who we once knew as Cassius Clay) was always on point with his charismatic rhetoric— despite being considered arrogant at times. Even so, he had a perspective that was difficult to argue with.

As a massive boxing fan—and a huge Ali fan—I have never seen him more calm and to the point then in this recently posted BBC video from 1971. Although Ali died in 2016, at 74 years old, his courage inside and outside the ring is legendary. In this excerpt, Ali explained to Michael Parkinson about how he used to ask his mother about white representation. Even though the interview is nearly 50 years old, it shows exactly how far we need to come as a country on the issues of racial inclusion and equality.


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