+
A research team in Israel made a 3D-printed heart from human tissue and vessels.

Have you ever stopped and thought, "How awesome would it be if I could live forever?"

The answer to that question is probably a hearty "yes," because most of us are both afraid of death and haven't yet watched enough "Twilight Zone" to recognize that immortality is kind of a scam.* Well, good news, seekers of everlasting life: A research team in Israel has created a 3D-printed heart that's actually made of human tissue and vessels.

Of course, this doesn't mean you living forever is a lock, yet. This heart is just a prototype at the beginning stages of its journey, but the implications of this research are incredible. While this heart is only fit for rabbit-sized animal, further experimentation may soon lead to larger hearts that could be used for human transplants. Patches that regenerate defective heart tissue, The Times of Israel notes, are also on the table.


“[This is] the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart replete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers,” Dr. Tal Dvir, who led the project, told the press.

“People have managed to 3D-print the structure of a heart in the past, but not with cells or with blood vessels."

The team's next challenge is to teach the heart to behave correctly (which seems like the setup to a rom/com if you ask me). Currently, the model heart can contract, but it cannot yet pump blood. After that's figured out, researchers can implant the hearts into animal models to see how they'll respond.

Optimistically, scientists hope that functioning human organs will be able to be printed in hospitals within the next ten years. Although Dvir believes that medical facilities will start with the "simpler organs" first.

One of the coolest things about the new breakthrough? The 3D-printed hearts can use a person's own tissue to create the artificial organ. So once this is a viable option, it'll also reduce the risk of bodies rejecting the organ.

Heart disease is the number one cause of death in the world. Could a 3D-printed heart change all that? We're be(a)tting on it!**

*Or have watched enough Twilight Zone to recognize that immortality is a scam and still think "I could do it better."

**Pun proudly intended.

Marlon Brando and Sacheen Littlefeather.

Nearly 50 years after Sacheen Littlefeather endured boos and abusive jokes at the Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is issuing a formal apology. In 1973, Littlefeather refused Marlon Brando's Best Actor Oscar on his behalf for his iconic role in “The Godfather” at the ceremony to protest the film industry’s treatment of Native Americans.

She explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

Littlefeather is a Native American civil rights activist who was born to a Native American (Apache and Yaqui) father and a European American mother.

Keep ReadingShow less

Jennifer Garner in 2010.

It’s back-to-school time for a lot of folks in America and that means getting the kids ready for another year in the classroom. For teachers, it often means forking out a lot of their own money to give the kids in their class the tools necessary to learn.

A 2018 study found that 94% of teachers spend their own money to stock their classrooms. The average teacher spends $479 and 7% of teachers spend more than $1,000. This comes at a time when, in inflation-adjusted terms, teacher salaries have declined by almost 4% over the past decade.

According to Newsweek, this unnecessary burden placed on teachers inspired entrepreneur Erin Foster, who has more than 600,000 followers on Instagram, to put out a story linking to teachers’ Amazon wishlists.

Erin Fuller-Wellman, a first grade teacher at Buffalo Elementary School in Wayne County, West Virginia, needed books for her classroom so she posted her wishlist on Foster’s “Clear the Lists” and Facebook, but she never believed the response she’d receive.

Keep ReadingShow less
via Pixabay

Can dogs and cats really live together?

A video of a man introducing his new puppy to the neighborhood cat is a wonderful piece of optimism. Why? Because the man shows he believes that if we make an effort, even nature’s fiercest enemies—dogs and cats—can get along.

Heck, it’s the type of thinking that could solve a lot of problems between humans as well. Maybe if we took some time to understand one another and get past negative stereotypes we could coexist without any trouble.

Keep ReadingShow less