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Recently, signs like this popped up in downtown Sarasota, Florida. They say "Don't give in to panhandling. 93% of the money you give goes to drugs and alcohol."


Shortly thereafter, this video came out purportedly showing how a homeless man spent $100 he was given.

It's a scene you've probably seen a gagillion times (which is a gagillion times too many). A homeless man is asking for help on the side of the road, and finally an empathetic passerby offers money. Only this time it's not just $1 or $2 ... he gives the homeless man $100!


Touched, the homeless man (whose name is Thomas) hugs Josh (the other dude) and they part ways.

Josh has his film crew start following Thomas.

(Which, for the record — whether or not this is real or staged — is super creepy and very exploitative, but the end result is worth talking about).

And they spend the day following him.

They follow him to a liquor/convenience store where Thomas purchases some goods.

When Thomas opens his shopping bag, he reveals food he purchased for other people in need.

He did not offer food to just one group either.

Finally, Josh lets Thomas know that he's been following him to see how he'd spend the $100.

(Again, creepy. But the overall point of the video is worth a conversation.)

Thomas explains that a couple of years ago he lost his job, he took care of his sick parents (who died), and then he lost his home.

He says many homeless people were working and for one reason or another, they found themselves on the street.

One of the most eye-opening parts of the video is at 3:20, when the homeless man explains what brought him to his circumstance.

We are only as strong as our weakest link. So let's empathize with each other.

Again, whether or not this video was real or staged, it's cold in many parts of the country right now, and if you see someone asking for money, maybe remember Thomas and the other men, women, and children who could use a boost. Let's not assume what someone is going to buy with our money, and let's not make it our responsibility to judge what people buy. It's a good time of year to be giving.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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