Heckling can be a dangerous sport. Especially when you try it with comedian Steve Hofstetter.

A sexist heckler recently learned this the hard way in front of his own daughters.

It started when Steve told a joke about why heckling is a bad choice.


"If you get upset with me and want to confront me after the show, don't do that," he warned.

Steve's set involved riffing about sexist dudes who yell about women covering sports events.

Steve took a moment to make the bold statement that women are people who, you know, are totally qualified to do jobs and stuff.

He shared a story about how a broadcaster named Jessica Mendoza became the first woman analyst in history to cover a post-season Major League Baseball game, making the astute and frustrating point that it took until 2015 to make that happen.

Mendoza sharing her expert commentary that dudebros just can't handle. Photo by Maxx Wolfson/Getty Images.

Steve followed this with his best imitation of all the dudes who were freaking out online because a woman dared to exist and have talent and be hired to do her job.

"There were so many men on Twitter just being like, 'She doesn't know what she's talking about, she's never played professional baseball.'"

"I'm like, yoooou've never played professional baseball. You're in your mother's basement,'" Steve says.

He then pointed out Mendoza's qualifications. Things like winning an Olympic gold medal and a World Championship, graduating from Stanford, and leading her team with a .495 average on the tour leading up to the 2008 Olympics. Not to mention spending three years working her way up to being a full time analyst for ESPN Sunday Night Baseball.

And that's when the heckler made a poor choice: He heckled.

The heckler yelled, "NEXT!"

Apparently he was bored by jokes that also happened to praise women with skills and talents for being good at their jobs.

Steve then lit into him and discovered an ironic thing: The heckler had brought his daughters.

And they were horribly embarrassed.

And then this happened.


Then he said, "That's f*!ked up, dude."

After that, it just got better.

Steve, being the consummate professional flipped it around and brought back the jokes:

We're all carriers. There could even be a woman in your family.

After the set was over, the heckler's family and Steve bonded over their shared disappointment.

Steve left this update in his YouTube channel comments.

That seems like a home run for sanity to me.

Watch Steve's anti-heckling, feminism 101 class here:

As Steve says, in his own words, before the video of the interaction (which you can watch below): "What follows is probably the angriest I've ever been on stage."

That first car is a rite of passage into adulthood. Specifically, the hard-earned lesson of expectations versus reality. Though some of us are blessed with Teslas at 17, most teenagers receive a car that’s been … let’s say previously loved. And that’s probably a good thing, considering nearly half of first-year drivers end up in wrecks. Might as well get the dings on the lemon, right?

Of course, wrecks aside, buying a used car might end up costing more in the long run after needing repairs, breaking down and just a general slew of unexpected surprises. But hey, at least we can all look back and laugh.

My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

Jimmy Fallon recently asked his “Tonight Show” audience on Twitter to share their own worst car experiences. Some of them make my brake fiasco look like cakewalk (or cakedrive, in this case). Either way, these responses might make us all feel a little less alone. Or at the very least, give us a chuckle.

Here are 22 responses with the most horsepower:

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When a couple has their first child, they start out with the greatest of intentions and expectations. The child will only eat organic food. They will never watch TV or have screen time and will always stay clean.

But soon, reality sets in and if they have more kids, they'll probably be raised with a lot less attention. As a result, first-born kids turn out a bit differently than their younger siblings.

"Rules are a bit more rigid, attention and validation is directed and somewhat excessive," Niro Feliciano, LCSW, a psychotherapist and anxiety specialist, told Parents. "As a result, firstborns tend to be leaders, high achievers, people-pleasing, rule-following and conscientious, several of the qualities that tend to predict success."

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