A 17-year-old turned these fallen leaves into incredible works of art.

It's fall! That means it's time to get excited about pumpkin spiced anything, Halloween, and of course, the beautiful falling leaves.

But there's someone who's even more excited about autumn than you are, if you can believe it. Her name is Joanna Wirażka.

And she is a leaf artist.


All photos via Joanna Wirażka, used with permission.

You might remember Wirażka's work from 2015, when she started to gain major notoriety for her incredible creations. Simply put, she creates miniature detailed paintings on fallen leaves.

Since then, she's been invited to share her art on TV, people have written about her work, and she's had thousands of people reach out to tell her how much they love her leaf art.

Her art is simply spellbinding.

And, thankfully, she's made more this year. So here are 11 of 17-year-old Wirażka's newest and most intricately gorgeous paintings, just in time for fall:

1. This one she calls "Paradise."

2. This Venetian canal.

3. This leaf is in honor of the victims of the Paris attacks in November 2015.

4. This Ferris wheel.

5. This one called "Faithful Friends."

6. This mesmerizing lightning storm.

7. "Modern Starry Night."

8. This burning orange sunset.

9. This one simply called "Happiness."

10. This garden under the stars.

11. This neon flamingo welcoming you to paradise.

At only 17, Wirażka's talents are well beyond her age. And she's only getting better.

"Everything which has happened over the past year I treat as an adventure," she said in an email. "I'm a young artist and still want to develop."

As for what's next, Wirażka said she's trying her hand at some different mediums, like painting on canvas, as well as some other new projects. After all, that's what the fall is all about: shedding the old to make room for new growth.

These gorgeous leaves might not be around forever, so we'd better enjoy them while we can.

via Fox 5 / YouTube

Back in February, northern Virginia was experiencing freezing temperatures, so FOX 5 DC's Bob Barnard took to the streets to get the low down. His report opens with him having fun with some Leesburg locals and trying his hand at scraping ice off their parked cars.

But at about the 1:50 mark, he was interrupted by an unaccompanied puppy running down the street towards the news crew.

The dog had a collar but there was no owner in sight.

Barnard stopped everything he was doing to pick the dog up off the freezing road to keep it safe. "Forget the people we talked to earlier, I want to get to know this dog," he told his fellow reporters back in the warm newsroom.

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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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