A 17-year-old turned these fallen leaves into incredible works of art.

It's fall! That means it's time to get excited about pumpkin spiced anything, Halloween, and of course, the beautiful falling leaves.

But there's someone who's even more excited about autumn than you are, if you can believe it. Her name is Joanna Wirażka.

And she is a leaf artist.


All photos via Joanna Wirażka, used with permission.

You might remember Wirażka's work from 2015, when she started to gain major notoriety for her incredible creations. Simply put, she creates miniature detailed paintings on fallen leaves.

Since then, she's been invited to share her art on TV, people have written about her work, and she's had thousands of people reach out to tell her how much they love her leaf art.

Her art is simply spellbinding.

And, thankfully, she's made more this year. So here are 11 of 17-year-old Wirażka's newest and most intricately gorgeous paintings, just in time for fall:

1. This one she calls "Paradise."

2. This Venetian canal.

3. This leaf is in honor of the victims of the Paris attacks in November 2015.

4. This Ferris wheel.

5. This one called "Faithful Friends."

6. This mesmerizing lightning storm.

7. "Modern Starry Night."

8. This burning orange sunset.

9. This one simply called "Happiness."

10. This garden under the stars.

11. This neon flamingo welcoming you to paradise.

At only 17, Wirażka's talents are well beyond her age. And she's only getting better.

"Everything which has happened over the past year I treat as an adventure," she said in an email. "I'm a young artist and still want to develop."

As for what's next, Wirażka said she's trying her hand at some different mediums, like painting on canvas, as well as some other new projects. After all, that's what the fall is all about: shedding the old to make room for new growth.

These gorgeous leaves might not be around forever, so we'd better enjoy them while we can.

Most Shared

Men are sharing examples of how they step up and step in when they see problematic behaviors in their peers, and people are here for it.

Twitter user "feminist next door" posed an inquiry to her followers, asking "good guys" to share times they saw misogyny or predatory behavior and did something about it. "What did you say," she asked. "What are your suggestions for the other other men in this situation?" She added a perfectly fitting hashtag: #NotCoolMan.

Not only did the good guys show up for the thread, but their stories show how men can interrupt situations when they see women being mistreated and help put a stop to it.

Keep Reading Show less
lop
Culture

Abigail Disney is the granddaughter of the late Roy Disney, the co-founder of the Walt Disney Co. Abigail herself does not have a job within the company, but she has made some public complaints about the way things are being run and how it is effecting the employees of the company.

Disney recently spoke on the Yahoo News show "Through Her Eyes," and shared a story of how a Magic Kingdom employee reached out to her about the poor working conditions at the theme park. So, Disney went to see for herself, and she did not like what she found.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Photo by Hunters Race on Unsplash

If you're a woman and you want to be a CEO, you should probably think about changing your name to "Jeffrey" or "Michael." Or possibly even "Michael Jeffreys" or "Jeffrey Michaels."

According to Fortune, last year, more men named Jeffrey and Michael became CEOs of America's top companies than women. A whopping total of one woman became a CEO, while two men named Jeffrey took the title, and two men named Michael moved into the C-suite as well.

The "New CEO Report" for 2018, which looks at new CEOS for the 250 largest S&P 500 companies, found that 23 people were appointed to the position of CEO. Only one of those 23 people was a woman. Michelle Gass, the new CEO of Kohl's, was the lone female on the list.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

Netflix

How much of what we do is influenced by what we see on TV? When it comes to risky behavior, Netflix isn't taking any chances.

After receiving a lot of heat, the streaming platform is finally removing a controversial scenedepicting teen suicide in season one of "13 Reasons Why. The decision comes two years after the show's release after statistics reveal an uptick in teen suicide.

"As we prepare to launch season three later this summer, we've been mindful about the ongoing debate around the show. So on the advice of medical experts, including Dr. Christine Moutier, Chief Medical Officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, we've decided with creator Brian Yorkey and the producers to edit the scene in which Hannah takes her own life from season one," Netflix said in a statement, per The Hollywood Reporter.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture