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Judah Friedlander is a comedian.


You might remember him from the TV show "30 Rock."


It's about to be a huge compliment! GIF via "30 Rock."

Judah, aka the comedian who wore those hats on "30 Rock," wrote a book recently, and it revealed a secret talent ... poignant cartooning.

I love these cartoons. They remind me of Kurt Vonnegut and The Far Side. And they have some deep things to say! Like these:

1. Interesting comparisons of what we stand in line for in 2015 versus 1931

All images by Judah Friedlander/"If the Raindrops United," used with permission.

2. Why some of us thought the 1950s were so "fabulous"

I told you they were poignant! Friedlander is not pulling punches here.

3. Will we really be better off if all small things are bought out by big things?

4. What defiance would look like in the literal face of a political system that allows no opposition ... represented by teeth

5. Triangle body image

6. America's most successful free housing program

7. How to support a disease agenda

8. An illustrated nod to the Citizen's United Supreme Court ruling

9. A minimalistic view of sea level rise

And the last page is something I really love.

It's simply some encouragement to be creative.

It reads: "Use these pages to make your own drawings. And send them to me. I'd love to see them."

:)

If you feel like actually sending him some cartoons because you're cool and fun like that, here's a link to his Twitter. ;)

There are TONS more. If you wanna see 'em, go grab the book at your local library or bookstore or check out "If the Raindrops United" online.

Sometimes when you're dealing with heavy thoughts, words won't do. Lucky for us we have folks like Judah.

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