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3 Essential Things To Read About Paul Ryan Today

Mitt Romney chose super-conservative superstar Rep. Paul Ryan as his vice-presidential nominee this morning. Read these articles if you want to know who he is and what this might mean for America.

3 Essential Things To Read About Paul Ryan Today

Mitt Romney will name Paul Ryan as his VP. Here's what that means.
Ezra Klein, Washington Post

This is an admission of fear from the Romney campaign. You don't make a risky pick like Paul Ryan if you think the fundamentals favor your candidate. You make a risky pick like Paul Ryan if you think the fundamentals don't favor your candidate. And, right now, the numbers don't look good for Romney: Obama leads in the Real Clear Politics average of polls by more than four percentage points — his largest lead since April.

12 Things You Should Know About Paul Ryan
Igor Volksy, Think Progress


  1. Ryan embraces the extreme philosophy of Ayn Rand.
  2. Ryan wants to raises taxes on the middle class, cuts them for millionaires.
  3. Ryan wants to end Medicare, replace it with a voucher system.
  4. Ryan thinks Social Security is a "ponzi scheme."
  5. Ryan's budget would result in 4.1 million lost jobs in 2 years.
  6. Ryan wants to eliminate Pell Grants for more more than 1 million students.
  7. Ryan supports $40 billion in subsides for big oil.
  8. Ryan has ownership stakes in companies that benefit from oil subsidies.
  9. Ryan claimed Romneycare has led to "rationing and benefit cuts."
  10. Ryan believes that Romneycare is "not that dissimilar to Obamacare."
  11. Ryan accused generals of lying about their support for Obama's military budget.
  12. Ryan co-sponsored a “personhood" amendment, an extreme anti-abortion measure.

Fussbudget: How Paul Ryan captured the G.O.P.
Ryan Lizza, New Yorker

Ryan recommended ending Medicare, the government health-insurance program for retirees, and replacing it with a system of direct payments to seniors, who could then buy private insurance. (The change would not affect current beneficiaries or the next decade of new ones.) He proposed ending Medicaid, the health-care program for the poor, and replacing it with a lump sum for states to use as they saw fit. Ryan also called for an end to the special tax break given to employers who provide insurance; instead, that money would pay for twenty-five-hundred-dollar credits for uninsured taxpayers to buy their own plans. As for Social Security, Ryan modestly scaled back his original proposal by reducing the amount invested in private accounts, from one-half to one-third of payroll taxes. Ryan's Roadmap also promised to cut other government spending, though it didn't specify how. Likewise, it promised to lower income-tax rates and simplify the tax code, but it didn't detail which popular deductions—mortgage interest? retirement contributions?—it would eliminate.
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Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
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